Article

This atlas is all about air; Resource shows how much wind available for energy projects

There has been some opposition to large-scale wind projects in areas like Yarmouth County, where residents living near wind farms have complained about noise. To address that and other concerns, the province is partnering with the Union of Nova Scotia Municipalities on a call for proposals to do a $45,000 study to develop wind turbine bylaws and policies.

Nova Scotia is putting its winds on the map.

"People are very serious about investing in wind energy and the first thing you have to do is say, hey, where can we establish a wind tower?" Energy Minister Bill Dooks said Tuesday after announcing the release of a wind atlas showing how much wind is available in Nova Scotia for potential energy projects.

"They'll be able to look at this atlas and identify a location - small industry, big industry and the ordinary person on the street."

The wind atlas, available online at nswindatlas.ca, was produced by researchers from the Applied Geomatics Research Group at the Nova Scotia Community College and from Universite de Moncton, which received a $78,000 grant from the province.

David Colville, the community college's lead researcher on the project, which also measured offshore winds and wind velocities at different heights, said Nova Scotia winds compare with winds in other parts of the world that have large-scale wind energy developments.

"We're sitting in a bit of a hot zone in terms of the wind potential," he said, noting the province has wind "hot spots" in the Cape Breton Highlands, the Canso and Pictou-Antigonish areas and in southwestern Nova Scotia.

... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

Nova Scotia is putting its winds on the map.

"People are very serious about investing in wind energy and the first thing you have to do is say, hey, where can we establish a wind tower?" Energy Minister Bill Dooks said Tuesday after announcing the release of a wind atlas showing how much wind is available in Nova Scotia for potential energy projects.

"They'll be able to look at this atlas and identify a location - small industry, big industry and the ordinary person on the street."

The wind atlas, available online at nswindatlas.ca, was produced by researchers from the Applied Geomatics Research Group at the Nova Scotia Community College and from Universite de Moncton, which received a $78,000 grant from the province.

David Colville, the community college's lead researcher on the project, which also measured offshore winds and wind velocities at different heights, said Nova Scotia winds compare with winds in other parts of the world that have large-scale wind energy developments.

"We're sitting in a bit of a hot zone in terms of the wind potential," he said, noting the province has wind "hot spots" in the Cape Breton Highlands, the Canso and Pictou-Antigonish areas and in southwestern Nova Scotia.

The provincial government plans to increase Nova Scotia's green electrical supply to 20 per cent of total supply by 2013. Part of that plan includes increasing the number of wind turbines from 40 to more than 250.

There has been some opposition to large-scale wind projects in areas like Yarmouth County, where residents living near wind farms have complained about noise. To address that and other concerns, the province is partnering with the Union of Nova Scotia Municipalities on a call for proposals to do a $45,000 study to develop wind turbine bylaws and policies.

"This is relatively new to Nova Scotia, we're very serious about putting these towers in the right place, we want to make people who live in their communities feel comfortable with this," Mr. Dooks said.

Brendan Haley, energy co-ordinator with the Ecology Action Centre in Halifax, called the wind atlas a positive development.

"We need to measure the wind resource and that needs to be public knowledge," said Mr. Haley, adding more needs to be done to ensure wind projects are built in Nova Scotia.

"The system we're using now to procure wind energy has unfortunately resulted in a lot of contract failures," he said, suggesting the province should promote local ownership and look to the European model of fixing the price of renewable energy per kilowatt hour to the cost of developing wind energy technology.

"Right now we allow wind producers to bid on these projects and oftentimes the North American experience has been that 50 per cent of these projects are not built," he said.

"The issue with climate change is that there's no shortage of solutions, there's no shortage of things to do. A wind map is an excellent step, but there's many more steps that we have to follow."

( berskine@herald.ca)


Source: http://thechronicleherald.c...

SEP 19 2007
https://www.windaction.org/posts/11131-this-atlas-is-all-about-air-resource-shows-how-much-wind-available-for-energy-projects
back to top