Articles filed under Erosion

EPA considers legal action over damage from wind farm landslide

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has said it is considering legal action against those responsible for a landslide at the construction site of a new wind farm. Last November’s slide at Meenbog in Co Donegal brought thousands of tonnes of peat and trees down the hillside and into the River Finn. ...Invis Energy, owners of the turbines which are being built to supply energy to Amazon data centres, declined to comment. 
30 Dec 2020

Donegal: Peat landslide linked to wind farm raised in Dáil

The collapse happened at the site of a wind farm under construction at Meenbog, near Ballybofey, County Donegal, last Thursday. A large quantity of peat slid down the hillside and ended up in the Mourne Beg River near Castlederg. ...The Ulster Angling Federation (UAF) has warned the river may struggle to recover fully from the landslide, which a spokesman labelled one of the largest pollution events in the history of Northern Ireland and Ireland.
18 Nov 2020

Amazing moment trees on hillside slide down slope after peat slippage on windfarm in Northern Ireland

While there were no reports of injury or concerns that the local water supply could be affected, one councillor said 'there are serious questions about how this happened.' Councillor Gary Doherty of Donegal County Council said: 'I've this morning requested an immediate stop on all works at the site until a full investigation is carried out and the full extent of the damage caused is known.' 
15 Nov 2020

€5m fine for wind farm disaster to double with €15,000 a day penalties

The 70-turbine wind farm, owned by Gort Windfarms, a company owned by ESB, was built in the Slieve Aughty Mountains between Gort and Loughrea, Co Galway in 2003 without proper environmental impact assessment. A landslide occurred during construction which caused major damage and is thought to have contributed to severe flooding the following year.
7 Jan 2020

State fined €5m over Co Galway wind farm

The wind farm was regarded as one of the largest in the EU when a landslide occurred during its construction in October 2003 by an ESB subsidiary, Hibernian Wind Power. At the time, large areas of forest and peat up to a depth of 5.5 metres on the top of the Cashlaundrumlahan mountain had been removed, causing the 2km-long “environmentally devastating” slide. Fish were killed and waterways polluted when half a million tonnes of peat and debris was displaced.
12 Nov 2019

EU court: Ireland should pay €1k a day for environment failings

A legal opinion issued by the Court of Justice of the EU (CJEU) has proposed that the State should be handed a daily fine of €1,000 for every day since its earlier ruling on July 3, 2008, until it achieves compliance with EU environmental legislation on assessing the impact of the development of a wind farm at Derrybrien in south Galway. Such a fine, if confirmed by the full ruling of the CJEU later this year, would result in a figure of €3,998,000 to date.
15 Jun 2019

Ireland faces EU fine of €1.7m over wind farm error

Its [Derrybrien wind farm in Galway] construction required the removal of large areas of forest and the extraction of peat up to 5.5 metres deep from the top of Cashlaundrumlahan Mountain, causing a devastating landslide in October 2003. The landslide destroyed the ecology of a 20km section of a nearby river system, killing around 50,000 fish.
26 Jan 2018

The 1996 Grafton flood and the 2016 vote on wind energy

In order to build the project, mountainous terrain must be blasted and graded to develop the roads to provide access of trucks and cranes to these high elevations.   The natural hydrology is interrupted and redirected, with tens of acres of imperious cover created.  To compensate for this change in the natural runoff patterns the Stiles Brook project would contain upwards of 50 plus structural storm water management facilities that would require maintenance in perpetuity. If these systems fail due to insufficient design or construction, lack of maintenance or poor siting, storm water runoff from the site will increase significantly.
11 Nov 2016

Storm-water system failures loom over old and new wind projects in Vermont

Smith said the runoff trouble was predicted by a team of 10 concerned Vermonters, including water quality experts and lawyers ...“At the end of each meeting, the people we met with told us there was massive political pressure (to approve the Lowell project),” she said. “During the meeting they told us we were raising good issues, and that they would look carefully at them and get back to us. Well they never got back to us and then the permits went out.”
12 Aug 2016

Anti-wind forum focuses on high-elevation water impacts

Geoff Goll, the principal engineer of Princeton Hydro, Exton, Pa., said that it is very difficult to control stormwater runoff from steep terrain, and he said that the measures currently being employed often don’t work. He said roads and trails would need to be built to the turbine sites themselves, creating impervious surfaces, which increases runoff and pollution. The Lowell Mountain wind project created 27 acres of impervious land, and total disturbance of the mountain totalled 135 acres.
23 Feb 2014

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