Articles filed under Impact on Birds from USA

Washington puts hawk on endangered list; Wind turbines partly to blame

In addition, the ridgeline of the Horse Heaven Hills is an important foraging area for raptors, it said. The Horse Heaven ridgeline is among the last remaining functional and uninterrupted shrub-steppe and natural grasslands in Benton County, it said. "Maintaining sufficient foraging area to support successful territories and nesting for ferruginous hawks and other raptors that use thermals and air currents associated with the Horse Heaven Hills seems particularly challenging with current proposed structure orientation," Washington state Fish and Wildlife said in its comments.
29 Aug 2021

Humans are terrible at finding bats and birds killed by wind turbines. Dogs are great at it.

Kayla Fratt began preparing for her summer job in March, when a package of frozen bat carcasses arrived for her in the mail. Well, actually, the bats were for her border collies, Barley and Niffler, and it is really their summer job too. They needed to learn the scent of a dead bat, because they would be spending three months on wind farms, looking for bats killed by spinning turbines.
23 Jul 2021

Biden administration quick to dismantle Trump’s interpretation of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act

On May 7, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) published a proposed rule that would revoke the Trump administration’s decision that the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) does not apply to the incidental take of protected migratory birds. If finalized, the proposed rule would represent a return to pre-Trump years, when courts disagreed about the scope of the MBTA, and USFWS exercised broad discretion whether to seek civil or criminal penalties against parties whose activities unintentionally harmed or killed migratory birds.
20 May 2021

Why do solar farms kill birds? Call in the AI bird watcher

In 2016, a first-of-its-kind study estimated that the hundreds of utility-scale solar farms around the US may kill nearly 140,000 birds annually. That’s less than one-tenth of one percent of the estimated number of birds killed by fossil-fuel power plants (through collisions, electrocution, and poisoning), but the researchers expected that number to nearly triple as planned solar farms come online. The link between solar facilities and bird deaths is still unclear. One leading theory suggests birds mistake the glare from solar panels for the surface of a lake and swoop in for a landing, with deadly results. “But that hypothesis is from a human perspective,” says Sporer. “Do birds even see the same way people do? We need to collect more data to form a complete picture.”
10 Aug 2020

Migratory birds in the crosswinds of federal, state protections

Nine out of 10 migratory birds are inadequately protected during at least one leg of their annual migrations, according to a 2015 study published in Science. Before 2017, a person could be prosecuted for accidentally killing a bird, but an opinion submitted by the Department of the Interior effectively changed that interpretation so that only intentional harm – mainly illegal hunting – is legally punishable.
13 Jul 2020

Don't sacrifice birds, environment

Stephanie Kromer, director of energy and environmental policy at the Ohio Chamber of Commerce, is using the coronavirus as a smokescreen to publicly rally for updating (read: weakening) the National Environmental Policy Act (“Refine regulatory landscape,” June 20).
4 Jul 2020

Democrats’ New Climate Plan will kill endangered species, environmentalists fear

It is notable that many of the conservationists defending wildlife from industrial wind turbines and transmission lines view the Democrats’ refurbished Green New Deal and its call for the “rapid deployment” of wind and transmission lines not as a climate dream but rather as an ecological nightmare. This isn’t the first time Democrats have shown a willingness to sacrifice wildlife for the wind industry.
30 Jun 2020

A clean-energy project on Lake Erie faces stiff head winds because of warblers and waterfowl

[The Ohio Power Siting] board unexpectedly imposed restrictions. It said Icebreaker must conduct radar studies of bird and bat traffic over the proposed site before and after construction. And nighttime operation of the turbines must be suspended during the months-long migration periods, unless and until studies conclude that is unnecessary. Opponents, some of whom have filed lawsuits to halt Icebreaker, consider the restrictions a victory. 
21 Jun 2020

https://www.windaction.org/posts?location=USA&topic=Impact+on+Birds&type=Article
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