Documents filed under Energy Policy from USA

Idaho HB 0265 Moratorium on wind turbines

H0265_thumb The Idaho House of Representatives is considering a bill that places a moratorium on "certain industrial wind farms and wind turbines for a time certain and to provide for an update to the Idaho Energy Plan". The full bill can be accessed by clicking on the links at the bottom of this page.
18 Mar 2011

The economic impact of Montana’s renewable portfolio standard

Montanarpsstudy_thumb The report, prepared by economists at the Beacon Hill Institute at Suffolk University in Boston, found that Montanans will likely pay $225 million more for power in 2015 because of the state's RPS, and it could cost them as much as $348 million more. Meanwhile there will be negligible environmental benefit, as it is unclear whether use of renewables such as wind and solar actually reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
31 Jan 2011

Wind and Energy Markets: A case study of Texas

Wind_and_energy_markets_thumb Many jurisdictions worldwide are greatly increasing the amount of wind production, with the expectation that increasing renewables will cost-effectively reduce greenhouse emissions. This paper discusses the interaction of increasing wind, transmission constraints, renewable credits, wind and demand correlation, intermittency, carbon prices, and electricity market prices using the particular example of the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) market. The complete paper can be accessed at the links provided below.
29 Aug 2010

Wisconsin Wind Siting Council Final Report

Wsc_final_report_and_cover_letter_8-9-2010_thumb This document represents the WI Wind Siting Council's final recommendations to the Public Service Commission regarding the proper siting of wind energy facilities. The Council was unable to achieve consensus on its findings and recommendations. Included in the document is a minority report prepared by four of the fifteen members sitting on the Council. Appendix B contains the straw proposal proffered by the Chairman of the Council, Dan Ebert. The straw proposal formed the basis of the recommendations.
9 Aug 2010

Kentucky Order denying proposed purchase agreement for Illinois Wind

200900545_06282010_thumb On December 29, 2009, Kentucky Power Company ("Kentucky Power") filed an application seeking authority to enter into a Renewable Energy Purchase Agreement ("Wind Contract") with FPL Illinois Wind, LLC ("FPL Wind"). Under the terms of the Wind Contract, Kentucky Power would purchase from FPL Wind a 100 MW share of the electrical output and environmental attributes of FPL Wind's Lee-DeKalb Wind Energy Center for a 20-year term.
28 Jun 2010

Michaels on the viability of wind as an economic choice for U.S. electrical future

100613michaels_testimony_final_thumb Economist Robert J. Michaels from California State University provided this testimony before the U.S. House Committee on Science and Technology Energy and Environment Subcommittee in reference to renewable energy policy. Dr. Michaels expresses doubts that wind energy will have much of an impact on displacing fossil fuels, or that government subsidies for the wind industry will create jobs. A summary of his testimony is provided below. His full testimony can be accessed by clicking on one of the links at the bottom of the page.
16 Jun 2010

A Renewable Electricity Standard: What it will really cost Americans

Renewable energy—harnessing the power of the wind and the sun—sounds wonderful until confronted with the facts. While wind and sun are indeed free, turning their energy into consumer-accessible electricity is not. Nor is it easy. Wind power must be used at the moment the wind is blowing— which it generally does not do during blazing-hot summer days, the peak of electricity use. Both solar and wind power require costly installations and transmission mechanisms. Instead of saving money for Americans, renewable energy sources are much more likely to spike their utility bills. Nevertheless, Congress is considering a mandate for a nationwide renewable electricity standard (RES). Heritage Foundation energy policy experts explain why an imposed national RES would be bad for families, bad for business, and bad for the economy.
5 May 2010

Think Twice: Why wind power mandates are wrong for the Northwest

Think_twice_051810_thumb Renewable energy on the Pacific Northwest's electricity grid has increased substantially over the years, and this is leading to a number of problems. For the Pacific Northwest, renewable energy expansion truly means wind energy expansion because it is the closest to being market-competitive of all renewable energy sources. Wind power, like hydroelectric power, is clean (i.e., carbon-free in its production), and this remains a large part of policymakers' attraction to wind. While the negative aspects of wind power are apparent, they are often overlooked. Ever increasing wind generation will have a significant impact on the reliability and affordability of electricity in the Pacific Northwest that very well might outweigh any of the claimed environmental benefits. This consise report by the Cascade Policy Institute examines the costs and impacts of wind power integration in the Pacific Northwest.
1 May 2010

Think Twice: Why wind power mandates are wrong for the Northwest

Think_twice_051810_thumb Renewable energy on the Pacific Northwest's electricity grid has increased substantially over the years, and this is leading to a number of problems. For the Pacific Northwest, renewable energy expansion truly means wind energy expansion because it is the closest to being market-competitive of all renewable energy sources. Wind power, like hydroelectric power, is clean (i.e., carbon-free in its production), and this remains a large part of policymakers' attraction to wind. While the negative aspects of wind power are apparent, they are often overlooked. Ever increasing wind generation will have a significant impact on the reliability and affordability of electricity in the Pacific Northwest that very well might outweigh any of the claimed environmental benefits. This consise report by the Cascade Policy Institute examines the costs and impacts of wind power integration in the Pacific Northwest.
1 May 2010

Think Twice: Why wind power mandates are wrong for the Northwest

Think_twice_051810_thumb Renewable energy on the Pacific Northwest's electricity grid has increased substantially over the years, and this is leading to a number of problems. For the Pacific Northwest, renewable energy expansion truly means wind energy expansion because it is the closest to being market-competitive of all renewable energy sources. Wind power, like hydroelectric power, is clean (i.e., carbon-free in its production), and this remains a large part of policymakers' attraction to wind. While the negative aspects of wind power are apparent, they are often overlooked. Ever increasing wind generation will have a significant impact on the reliability and affordability of electricity in the Pacific Northwest that very well might outweigh any of the claimed environmental benefits. This consise report by the Cascade Policy Institute examines the costs and impacts of wind power integration in the Pacific Northwest.
1 May 2010

https://www.windaction.org/posts?location=USA&p=3&topic=Energy+Policy&type=Document
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