Articles filed under Energy Policy from USA

Renewing Utility Income - Taking another look at the renewables business

Conclusion- Renewable power is here to stay. Utilities should embrace it as an opportunity and work to shape the regulatory and legislative developments so important to the renewables sector. They should develop and implement regulatory strategies for renewables. This new approach requires a careful choice of business model. For some, the traditional build/own/operate model or the newer contract model may make sense. Others will find that a new approach to renewables requires a new business model like the network manager model.
18 Nov 2005

Putting the Spin on Wind

It’s going to get complicated and emotional, but whatever comes out in the wash is certain to affect the backyards of all Highland residents one way or another. And certainly, those of all Virginians. Editor's note: a 'Flow Chart on Wind Energy Players in Virginia' that accompanied this article is available as a 'document' (11/18/05). The flow chart is an initial effort to show the interconnections/collusion between the different entities working to promote wind development in Virginia.
18 Nov 2005

Clarkstown purchases wind power

CLARKSTOWN — Wind power will now help to keep streetlights and municipal buildings lit. The alternative energy source would cost the town about $12,000 more a year, a minimal impact because of rising gas prices, said Amy Mele, deputy town attorney for purchasing. "It's not about savings, but more a policy statement," Mele said. "We're trying to make it a more competitive form of energy."
17 Nov 2005

Full Text of Governor Romney's Letter to Interior Secretary Norton

"..I urge MMS to wait until it establishes guidelines to all offshore wind projects before it acts upon an individual project, such as Cape Wind. In my opinion, the review of this project at this time would make little sense and would undermine the goal of developing comprehensive guidelines that establish the specific criteria for reviewing such projects, including those that specifically protect the interests of any state affected by the project.
15 Nov 2005

Wind energy's potential - and problems

The issue of reliability is brushed aside. Cape Wind proposes to replace (Greenpeace citation) 75 percent of now-fossil-produced power to the area. Imagine what happens if the wind stops or becomes too brisk. In the former case, you had better have a source of standby power available immediately. In the case of too much wind, the effect is the same. The turbines are designed to "feather" to self-protect, but the result is the same as no wind at all.
14 Nov 2005

Wind turbine plan expands to Sutton </p>

Gov. Jim Douglas has rightly said that the push for industrial wind power should slow down. Vermonters need to think about where these enormous wind towers are being proposed: on top of our mountains in some of the most beautiful corners of the state. Industrial wind turbines don't belong on Vermont's ridgelines.
11 Oct 2005

Vermont wind energy debate gains clarity

Bravo. Finally, a declarative statement on wind energy after months of murky confusion. Finally, a break in the clouds that have shrouded an issue that is critical to all Vermonters but has been driven largely by wind developers and advocates. Taken at face value, Gov. Jim Douglas is saying "No" to big wind.
4 Oct 2005

Wind energy month: What does that mean?

It suggests a welcoming atmosphere for the industrial wind developers who are gauging the state's appetite for wind towers on our ridgelines. That's not the intent of the proclamation, according to Jason Gibbs, the governor's spokesman. It's about promoting renewable energy in general, and small wind power projects specifically -- on "a Vermont scale."
30 Sep 2005

https://www.windaction.org/posts?location=USA&p=271&topic=Energy+Policy&type=Article
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