Articles filed under Impact on Birds from USA

Rural residents battling large corporations over planned wind farms

A pair of large wind energy facilities proposed in Clay, Jack and Montague counties would wreak havoc on the whooping cranes that pass through the area as part of their migratory pattern, according to a wildlife group. That’s the assessment of wildlife biologist Jennifer Blair of Blair Wildlife Consulting, who was hired by the North Texas Heritage Association to study the plans offered by Apex Clean Energy and EDF Renewables.
13 May 2020

New York’s Accelerated Renewable Energy Act poses risks to birds

The Act creates a new Office of Renewable Energy Siting, which will work with other agencies to review and set conditions for proposed renewable energy projects. The input of wildlife management agencies will be crucial to ensure that birds receive adequate protection, but under the new law, these agencies are given short time windows to participate. Insufficient staffing, busy seasons, and many other factors could prevent meaningful review and input, potentially leaving birds largely out of the discussion.
11 May 2020

The fight over wind power in Lake Erie

Bird migration is underway on the southern shore of Lake Erie. At the Black Swamp Bird Observatory (BSBO), a road through a remnant of the once-vast Great Lakes coastal marsh is filling up with cars driven by birders, clutching binoculars and eager for an early glimpse of migratory birds. Robert Sink comes a few times a week from Findlay, Ohio, about an hour away, with his tripod and telephoto camera lens. He posts daily on a Facebook group for Ohio bird photographers. “When the season becomes warmer, I’ll be up here every other day or so,” he tells me.
1 May 2020

Bald eagle killed by wind turbine at Wood County site

“What happened with the turbine blade killing that bald eagle over in Wood County — that just confirmed our worst fears,” he said. “That dead eagle is the reality of this issue, and it shows that this can happen right here in our backyard. It is awful, and you just hope you can find someone who is interested on the federal level and get them to take some kind of action.” Mark Shieldcastle, a retired avian biologist from the ODNR who is widely recognized as the region’s preeminent expert on birds and bald eagles, said the flying and hunting patterns of bald eagles put them in a very precarious position when wind turbines sprout in their habitat.
1 May 2020

Outdoors: Bald eagles fly into turbulent wind farm debate

But as the grassroots groups battling the Northwest Ohio wind farm projects continue to wade through a swamp of uncertainty as they deal with attorneys, politicians, lobbyists and the Ohio Power Siting Board, which regulates the siting of wind farms, their strongest ally might turn out to be a scavenger whose persona affords it an almost saintly aura — the bald eagle.
25 Jan 2020

Drastic loss of bird population deeply troubling

Losses of regional birds hit us hardest. Few people may have noticed that we have been seeing fewer indigo bunting, scarlet tanager, ovenbird or rufus-sided towhee. They live in heavy cover and never have been very numerous. But when we look at typical backyard birds like dark-eyed junco, whose population slipped back 175 million individuals, or the white-throated sparrow, which declined by 93 million individual birds, this hits home.
6 Oct 2019

Drastic loss of bird population deeply troubling

Losses of regional birds hit us hardest. Few people may have noticed that we have been seeing fewer indigo bunting, scarlet tanager, ovenbird or rufus-sided towhee. They live in heavy cover and never have been very numerous. But when we look at typical backyard birds like dark-eyed junco, whose population slipped back 175 million individuals, or the white-throated sparrow, which declined by 93 million individual birds, this hits home.
6 Oct 2019

Where have the wild birds gone? 3 billion fewer than 1970

“People need to pay attention to the birds around them because they are slowly disappearing,” said study lead author Kenneth Rosenberg, a Cornell University conservation scientist. “One of the scary things about the results is that it is happening right under our eyes. We might not even notice it until it’s too late.”
19 Sep 2019

Questionable actions: Apex’s use of helicopter may have scared eagles off Galloo

Mr. Schneider said there are less-intrusive ways to survey the islands for eagles. Western EcoSystems Technology Inc. conducted on-ground surveys for Apex in 2017 and 2018. He said that Apex already knew that eagles used Galloo Island for breeding, and he wasn’t certain if any state agency required the firm to conduct additional surveys. The question remains how long will the state put up with bad faith actions on the part of Apex.
21 May 2019

Proposed wind turbines generating conflict

To avoid bird deaths, the organization said, companies shouldn’t locate wind turbines in areas where there is high risk of bird collisions. “In my opinion, there are probably two places that are absolutely the worst places to put wind turbines. It’s the Great Lakes region and the Gulf Coast of the United States,” said Shawn Graff, vice president of the Great Lakes Region at the American Bird Conservancy. “In these areas, during migration, the number of birds is huge.”
13 Feb 2019

Nebraska Sandhills and whooping cranes find mutual friend in western Nebraska senator

Rath and others who are concerned about the Nebraska Public Power District's R Project power line and the wind farms that are popping up across the land — and the whooping cranes — have found a champion in the Nebraska Legislature. Sen. Tom Brewer of Gordon has taken up their cause with proposed legislation and advocacy, working from his Capitol office in Lincoln. 
19 Jan 2019

Offshore Turbines Could Put Rare Shorebirds at Risk

The recent record-breaking auction of development rights for offshore wind-energy installations off the coast of southern New England proves that developers are confident that obstacles to their construction and operation will likely be few. But after just two years of operation of the nation’s first offshore wind facility — the much-heralded Block Island Wind Farm — there is still a great deal unknown about their long-term environmental impact.
19 Dec 2018

https://www.windaction.org/posts?location=USA&p=2&topic=Impact+on+Birds&type=Article
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