Articles filed under Impact on Views from UK

Protesters object to wind turbines on moor

Britain’s oldest national conservation body, the Open Spaces Society, has lodged an objection to plans to build nine 360ft high wind turbines on the edge of Exmoor, which it said would be a “blot on the landscape”. The Open Spaces Society (OSS) has submitted an objection to North Devon District Council against the plan by npower renewables to build the turbines at Batsworthy Cross between South Molton and Tiverton. Kate Ashbrook, the OSS’s general secretary, said the turbines would be visible for many miles and would spoil people’s enjoyment of the area.
9 Dec 2006

Refusal for Al Fayed turbine site

A plan for a wind farm on land owned by businessman Mohamed Al Fayed has been refused by Highland councillors. Almost half the council’s 80 members took the unusual step of visiting the site at Invercassley near Lairg in Sutherland. Councillors decided the 23-turbine plan was outwith the local authority’s renewable energy policy and would be visually unattractive. An appeal against the decision refusing the planning application is expected.
7 Dec 2006

Decision time for Moorsyde windfarm plan

A scheme to build a ten turbine wind farm in north Northumberland is controversially being recommended for approval in principle. It is almost two years since Your Energy submitted plans for a wind farm at Moorsyde between Shoresdean and Duddo and decision time has finally arrived. Berwick Borough Council’s planning committee will make a decision at what is likely to be a stormy meeting in Ancroft Memorial Hall on Tuesday (6pm). The recommendation comes after a study by consultants Ferguson McIlveen concluded the wind farm would not have such an adverse visual impact as to warrant refusal.
7 Dec 2006

Giant turbines would hit Ochil views inquiry hears

Controversial plans for 10 giant wind turbines in the scenic Ochil Hills would have “major adverse effects on visual amenity,” particularly the views from the King’s Golf Course at world-famous Gleneagles Hotel. It would also impact on the nearby village of Dunning and other viewpoints in Strathearn, according to David Tyldesley, principal of Edinburgh-based planning and environmental consultants David Tyldesley Associates. And he added: “Mitigation measures would have little effect in reducing these impacts.” He was giving evidence at the inquiry, held in the Glenfarg Hotel, on behalf of Perth and Kinross Council.
5 Dec 2006

Hopes raised as inspector throws out turbine plan

The rejection at a planning inquiry of a controversial plan to build three massive wind turbines on the edge of Dartmoor has given hope to campaigners fighting against onshore wind turbines that future planning appeals will also fail. Campaigners against onshore wind turbine development were celebrating last night. They said they hoped the decision rejecting the three 266ft-high turbines because of visual intrusion would pave the way for further refusals at planning inquiries into Westcountry windfarm applications in the next few weeks.
10 Nov 2006

The hills are alive…with the sound of objection

A community group has warned local people that the beauty of the Braid Valley could be blighted by the equivalent of up to 40 Statues of Liberty. The Braid Valley Preservation Group has said a new application for 22 wind turbines on Elginny Hill, outside Broughshane, will have a “devastating impact” on the area’s scenery making a mockery of “the Gateway to the Glens”.
21 Oct 2006

Windfarm protesters attack developers’ montage

Skye campaigners yesterday condemned a developer’s photo montage of one of Scotland’s most controversial windfarms as a “gross misrepresentation” of its true potential impact on the area. The colour image, which features in an Amec newsletter to the local community in and around Edinbane, gives the clear impression that the 330ft high turbines would be barely visible.
17 Oct 2006

Take an Ike: allies fight wind farm threat at Scottish White House

The granddaughter of General Dwight D Eisenhower, who led the allied forces to victory in the Second World War, has linked up with the National Trust for Scotland to see off a serious threat to the landscape around the castle that became his Scottish home. A wind farm company has submitted plans to build 15 turbines on the hill that overlooks Culzean Castle, the 18th-century Robert Adam masterpiece owned by the trust on the Ayrshire coast. Its magnificent top-floor apartment was given by its former owner to Eisenhower at the end of the war to thank the US general for the part he played in commanding Scottish troops and defeating the Nazi menace.
10 Sep 2006

https://www.windaction.org/posts?location=UK&p=183&topic=Impact+on+Views&type=Article
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