Articles from New Hampshire

TransAlta upgrades Antrim Wind aircraft lights, responds to AG

TransAlta, the company operating Antrim’s wind turbine project, affirmed their obligation to properly operating and maintaining the radar-activated aircraft warning lights on the turbines. Their announcement came as a response to concerns voiced by the state Attorney General’s office in late May. TransAlta has “always accepted” the obligation to properly operate and maintain its turbine lighting system.
4 Jun 2021

AG’s office weighs in on state investigation of Antrim wind turbine complaints

“Antrim Wind appears to argue that, although it is working in good faith to ensure a functioning ADLS, these efforts are essentially gratuitous,” Senior Assistant Attorney General and Chief of the Environmental Protection Bureau Allen Brooks wrote in the analysis. “if this position is accepted, Antrim Wind is under no obligation to ever properly run the ADLS.”
31 May 2021

New England energy execs emphasize reliability over renewables

"This is really not an easy path forward,” said Emily Reichert, CEO of Greentown Labs, a green energy tech incubator in Somerville, Mass. “You have to prioritize safety and reliability and keep the lights on and the heat on for everyone and transition to the future.” The region can’t suddenly switch to cleaner sources of energy without ensuring that everyone’s energy needs can be met, said Dan Dolan, president of the New England Power Generators Association.
19 May 2021

Take a letter: But will SEC read it?

What does it say about New Hampshire government priorities that it adds a new and unnecessary office (see related editorial today) but can’t provide its Site Evaluation Committee with someone to open the mail and inform the public about public hearings?
14 Apr 2021

Antrim Wind to face SEC scrutiny

“The SEC meeting yesterday was perhaps the most frustrating I have ever witnessed and I’ve been intervening before the SEC for 15 years,” Linowes related in an email on March 26th. “The problem is tied to a Chair who cannot seem to keep track of the facts in front of her, Committee members who are disengaged, ignorant about the SEC, and easily confused, and a bureaucratic body that is feeling beat up by the public and afraid to act. The only outcome of yesterday was that the Nov 23 meeting and acceptance of the Antrim Wind monitoring report meant nothing beyond the Committee taking the report in hand."
2 Apr 2021

What’s that noise? SEC hears windmills

The state Site Evaluation Committee is one pretty powerful entity, which is why its action, or lack thereof, in the Antrim windmill project was so disconcerting. The SEC seems to have righted itself on this one, but only after state senators called it to task for ignoring windmill neighbors’ complaints.
28 Mar 2021

State promises investigation of Antrim Wind complaints

“Please, when you consider noise with a wind turbine, that it is sometimes loud and sometimes quiet,” Lerner told committee members, reminding them that the intent of their rules ought to be a “shall not exceed” limit. The project’s motion-activated lighting also hasn’t worked correctly since its installation, Lerner said. The blinking red lights on the towers frequently light up,   rather than just activating when an aircraft approaches, as they were intended to, she said, and it’s been a year since both Antrim Wind and the SEC were alerted to the problem, with no fixes to show for it.
26 Mar 2021

State Senators, Rep chastise SEC

New Hampshire State Senators Jeb Bradley, Bob Giuda and Ruth Ward, as well as Rep. Michael Vose sent a letter to the Site Evaluation Committee (SEC) on Jan. 29 pointing out that the Committee has been sidelining public complaints about noise the Antrim Wind Energy turbines make in the Antrim area.
20 Feb 2021

Antrim turbines churn up controversy

What Antrim residents who complained of turbine noise levels are especially upset about is that the SEC, at this meeting that they missed due to it not being directly noticed to them, adopted a report that they believe is not acceptable under the SEC’s own rules regarding the Conditions of the AWE Certificate.  ...So, to summarize, the Town of Antrim was not directly notified of the meeting, those making the complaints were not directly notified, no transcript of what took place in the November 23 meeting – now a month ago – has been made available, and no meeting to consider the complaints has been scheduled as of yet. 
31 Dec 2020

New England business groups make case to suspend energy efficiency surcharges

The business groups argue that halting the surcharges would provide some rate relief to both commercial and residential customers at a time when many are having financial difficulties as a result of the COVID-19 shutdown. “We’re not looking to decimate these programs, but we are saying, ‘We’ve got to take a breather,’” said Doug Gablinske, executive director of the Energy Council of Rhode Island, which represents large energy users.
9 Jun 2020

Fishermen seek delay in Gulf of Maine offshore wind planning

In deeper waters of the gulf, wind power will be achieved only with the use of floating turbines. The extensive anchoring and cabling that would be required means “lease areas will become de facto closures to fishing,” the Responsible Offshore Development Alliance wrote in an April 14 letter the governors of Maine, New Hampshire and Massachusetts, and the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management.
16 Apr 2020

New England fishing groups wary of rapid offshore wind development plans

Those types of disputes are “what we’re trying to avoid happening now,” said Annie Hawkins, executive director of the Responsible Offshore Development Alliance, or RODA. The coalition of fishing stakeholders aims to get the industry on the same page as researchers and wind developers across the region. “We’re trying to make sure fishermen are much more involved in the process from day one,” Hawkins said. She’d like to see more work across state lines to coordinate policy and research.
7 Apr 2020

Angry US landowners are killing off renewable energy projects

The conflict stems from the vacant-land myth: the notion that there’s plenty of unused land out there in flyover country that’s ready and waiting to be covered with wind turbines, solar panels, power lines and other infrastructure. The truth is that growing numbers of rural and suburban landowners are resisting these types of projects. They don’t want to endure the noise and shadow flicker produced by 500- or 600-foot-high wind turbines. Nor do they want miles of transmission lines built through their towns, so they are fighting to protect their property values and views.
7 Mar 2020

Antrim wind project complete

Energy produced by the turbines will be sold under long-term power purchase agreements ...The project’s completion comes despite significant pushback, with opponents saying it could disrupt wildlife habitat, intrude on scenic views, cause too much noise and lower property values.
4 Feb 2020

Opposition to battery energy storage system grows fiercer in Littleton

Opposition to the proposed industrial-scale lithium-ion battery energy storage system (BESS) at the dead end of Foster Hill Road has grown fiercer. On Tuesday, the roughly 100 residents turning out to the Littleton Opera House put both the applicant and the Zoning Board of Adjustment on the hot seat during a public hearing that was again continued, until March 24. ...The system would store electrical energy using specialized battery store containers and would go on 13 of the 27 wooded acres owned by Aaron Scott DeAngelis, who would lease the site to LITUS. The utility-scale batteries, in 96 containers, each 40-feet-long and 8-feet-wide and spaced 15 feet apart, would be charged at night at a lower price, temporarily stored, and sold back to the electric grid as needed at higher price.
16 Jan 2020

https://www.windaction.org/posts?location=New+Hampshire&type=Article
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