Articles filed under Noise from New Hampshire

What’s that noise? SEC hears windmills

The state Site Evaluation Committee is one pretty powerful entity, which is why its action, or lack thereof, in the Antrim windmill project was so disconcerting. The SEC seems to have righted itself on this one, but only after state senators called it to task for ignoring windmill neighbors’ complaints.
28 Mar 2021

State promises investigation of Antrim Wind complaints

“Please, when you consider noise with a wind turbine, that it is sometimes loud and sometimes quiet,” Lerner told committee members, reminding them that the intent of their rules ought to be a “shall not exceed” limit. The project’s motion-activated lighting also hasn’t worked correctly since its installation, Lerner said. The blinking red lights on the towers frequently light up,   rather than just activating when an aircraft approaches, as they were intended to, she said, and it’s been a year since both Antrim Wind and the SEC were alerted to the problem, with no fixes to show for it.
26 Mar 2021

State Senators, Rep chastise SEC

New Hampshire State Senators Jeb Bradley, Bob Giuda and Ruth Ward, as well as Rep. Michael Vose sent a letter to the Site Evaluation Committee (SEC) on Jan. 29 pointing out that the Committee has been sidelining public complaints about noise the Antrim Wind Energy turbines make in the Antrim area.
20 Feb 2021

Antrim turbines churn up controversy

What Antrim residents who complained of turbine noise levels are especially upset about is that the SEC, at this meeting that they missed due to it not being directly noticed to them, adopted a report that they believe is not acceptable under the SEC’s own rules regarding the Conditions of the AWE Certificate.  ...So, to summarize, the Town of Antrim was not directly notified of the meeting, those making the complaints were not directly notified, no transcript of what took place in the November 23 meeting – now a month ago – has been made available, and no meeting to consider the complaints has been scheduled as of yet. 
31 Dec 2020

Antrim man to record sound data on Antrim Wind project

“We decided it would make sense to get started as soon as possible so we can have a baseline bunch of data of infrasound for this area before turbines go into operation,” Block said. “When they do go into operation – which is at least a year off, according to their building schedule – we will be able to chart the differences.”
5 Sep 2018

Effects of turbines in question; Company files plan for wind farm

Within six months of the turbines being set in motion, Marshall suffered a stroke and a heart attack, he said. He felt stressed all the time and couldn't sleep. The culprit, he thinks, was the low-frequency noise emitted from the spinning turbines. "We were told that none of this would happen," Marshall said. "These things were supposed to be whisper quiet." Marshall's experience is troublesome to Lawrence Mazur, a Rumney resident watching closely as the neighboring town of Groton moves toward hosting a 24-turbine, 48-megawatt wind farm along the Tenney and Fletcher mountain ridges overlooking the Baker River Valley.
12 Apr 2010

Like Chinese water torture

There has been much discussion lately about industrial wind power on Vermont's mountains. The Lempster, N.H., turbine site is often used as an example of a typical wind tower site, especially after Green Mountain Power's Dec. 5 bus trip for Lowell residents. I am a Vermont resident, but I have an insider's perspective of the Lempster site. I own two pieces of land on Lempster Mountain, one of which has been in my family for over 70 years.
20 Jan 2010

The turbine turmoil: South Berwick residents, officials discuss pros and cons of wind energy

[T]here are some negatives associated with the increasingly popular form of alternative energy, according to a University of New Hampshire expert. But the cons - mainly noise and vibrations from the rotating turbines - are generally things people can live with, UNH assistant professor of geography Mary Lemcke said. In South Berwick, a 300-foot-high ridge across from Marshwood High School is being eyed as a possible location for a wind farm. A Cape Neddick-based alternative energy company is conducting a yearlong wind study there with the hopes a wind farm would be viable. For Wisconsin resident Gerry Meyer, however, the sound of five 400-foot-tall wind turbines located within three quarters of a mile of his home is simply unbearable.
23 Oct 2008

https://www.windaction.org/posts?location=New+Hampshire&p=4&topic=Noise&type=Article
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