Articles filed under Energy Policy from Massachusetts

Many costs, few benefits of wind power

Massachusetts has an ambitious goal for renewable-energy development but no realistic plan or guidelines to reach it. The result is a free-for-all with the state lavishing money on wind-power development in the Berkshires, investors and other states benefiting from the largess, and Berkshire towns and residents left in the dark as to the real consequences for our community, our economy, and our beautiful mountains.Editor's Note: Eleanor Tillinghast is head of Green Berkshires, Inc., an environmental group based in western Massachusetts.
4 Mar 2006

Patrick challenges Healey to support Cape Wind

BOSTON—Wednesday, February 8, 2006—As energy prices this winter shock Bay State residents like never before, Deval Patrick today called upon Kerry Healey to support the Cape Wind project, a major clean energy project that will help stabilize electricity prices and reduce costs for Massachusetts energy consumers.
8 Feb 2006

Big gaps in state's plans for emissions

Governor Mitt Romney has touted Massachusetts's first-in-the-nation plan to limit greenhouse gas emissions from the dirtiest power plants, but the plan that went into effect Jan. 1 remains incomplete, and Romney is pushing changes that could allow plants to avoid pollution reductions.
17 Jan 2006

Catching the sea breeze

CRITICS OF PROPOSED US offshore wind farms have recently lauded efforts to develop deep-water offshore wind energy technologies that would allow wind farms to be built far from shore. They suggest that advances in research and development are proceeding at such a rapid pace that thousands of wind turbines could soon be operating off the northeast coast without encroaching on anyone's view or posing any threat to the environment. Clarification about the current state and potential of deep-water offshore wind energy appears timely.
11 Jan 2006

MIT team analyzes wind energy potential in Northeast

There's more to determining the value of wind power than knowing which way the wind blows -- or even how hard. MIT researchers studying winds off the Northeast coast have found that estimating the potential environmental benefits from wind and other renewables requires a detailed understanding of the dynamics of both renewable resources and conventional power generation.
3 Jan 2006

GOP appointee set to run DTE

Last May, in a move some industry officials say contributed to her promotion to chairwoman, Judson voted against approvals for an 18-mile, mostly undersea power cable crucial to the 130-turbine Cape Wind electric generation project in Nantucket Sound, which Romney opposes.
29 Dec 2005

MIT team analyzes wind energy potential in Northeast

There's more to determining the value of wind power than knowing which way the wind blows -- or even how hard. MIT researchers studying winds off the Northeast coast have found that estimating the potential environmental benefits from wind and other renewables requires a detailed understanding of the dynamics of both renewable resources and conventional power generation. Data show that wind-energy facilities would generate far more electricity in winter, because that's when winds are strongest. But the need for electricity is greatest in summer, when air conditioners are going full blast.
21 Dec 2005

Misplaced Faith In Wind Energy

Unless Massachusetts residents take on the challenge, they will see millions of dollars transferred from their pockets through higher prices for electricity and taxes to the pockets of companies that own wind farms. Billions of capital investment dollars will be spent on projects that produce tiny amounts of electricity, electricity that is unreliable and low in quality and value.
14 Dec 2005

Let The Wind Power Us From Deep Water

These examples show that offshore wind technology is advancing so rapidly that sacrificing Nantucket Sound for a project like the one currently being proposed is shortsighted. In the near future, the public could get the same benefits from building an offshore wind plant farther out to sea with far fewer negative impacts, and at the same time avoid being saddled with what may well become an obsolete technology.
9 Dec 2005

https://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Massachusetts&p=22&topic=Energy+Policy&type=Article
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