Library filed under Energy Policy from Massachusetts

South Shore’s Electric Avenue: NStar line would provide crucial power boost for Boston

What the new transmission cables don’t do, however, is add to the overall power generating capacity in New England. Overall, New England has a peak generating capacity of about 32,000 megawatts of electricity, and the region’s increasing demand is creating the need for about one more power plant a year, according to ISO New England.
27 May 2006

Regional leaders discuss energy at governors, premiers conference

Lee also warned that renewable energy sources, though desirable, were not a "silver bullet" solution. "It does leave an environmental footprint," Lee said, noting that wind energy and solar energy take up large areas of land, making it difficult to find a place to put them, especially in densely populated parts of the world.
13 May 2006

The New England Council and the New England Energy Alliance Outline Support for Nuclear Power in New England

If New England's nuclear energy plants had to be replaced by other non-emitting sources of electricity to meet the RGGI goals, the region would be looking at large-scale wind projects, with weather-dependent output, spread over some 650,000 acres of land or water at a cost of more than $10 billion.
11 Apr 2006

The Challenge of Energy Policy in New England

Rr0602_thumb Renewable energy sources have disadvantages as well as advantages, however. Although their costs have decreased in recent years, many renewables are still more costly than traditional sources. Some are also available only intermittently; for example, wind can be variable and hydroelectric is seasonal. And while many people are in favor of renewables in principle, many are also unhappy when faced with the prospect of a windmill or a trash-burning power plant in their neighborhood. These facilities face the same siting and investment difficulties that any electrical facility would, as the developers of a proposed wind farm off the coast of Cape Cod have discovered in recent years.
1 Apr 2006

Many costs, few benefits of wind power

Massachusetts has an ambitious goal for renewable-energy development but no realistic plan or guidelines to reach it. The result is a free-for-all with the state lavishing money on wind-power development in the Berkshires, investors and other states benefiting from the largess, and Berkshire towns and residents left in the dark as to the real consequences for our community, our economy, and our beautiful mountains.Editor's Note: Eleanor Tillinghast is head of Green Berkshires, Inc., an environmental group based in western Massachusetts.
4 Mar 2006

Draft 2004 New England Marginal Emission Rate Analysis

Marginalemissionrateanalysis_thumb ...the MEA Report can be used to estimate the value (avoided emissions) of Renewable Energy Certificates (REC) by providing both REC suppliers and stakeholders with information that can be used to communicate the environmental benefits of RECs and works to enhance the overall REC marketplace. Editor's Note: As noted below under Methodology [emphasis added], this report appears to substantiate the point that wind energy would not backdown "baseload" generation.
28 Feb 2006

Patrick challenges Healey to support Cape Wind

BOSTON—Wednesday, February 8, 2006—As energy prices this winter shock Bay State residents like never before, Deval Patrick today called upon Kerry Healey to support the Cape Wind project, a major clean energy project that will help stabilize electricity prices and reduce costs for Massachusetts energy consumers.
8 Feb 2006

Big gaps in state's plans for emissions

Governor Mitt Romney has touted Massachusetts's first-in-the-nation plan to limit greenhouse gas emissions from the dirtiest power plants, but the plan that went into effect Jan. 1 remains incomplete, and Romney is pushing changes that could allow plants to avoid pollution reductions.
17 Jan 2006

Catching the sea breeze

CRITICS OF PROPOSED US offshore wind farms have recently lauded efforts to develop deep-water offshore wind energy technologies that would allow wind farms to be built far from shore. They suggest that advances in research and development are proceeding at such a rapid pace that thousands of wind turbines could soon be operating off the northeast coast without encroaching on anyone's view or posing any threat to the environment. Clarification about the current state and potential of deep-water offshore wind energy appears timely.
11 Jan 2006

https://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Massachusetts&p=22&topic=Energy+Policy
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