Library filed under Energy Policy from Kansas

Candidates agree: State energy may be due for change

Republican Jim Barnett thinks hydrogen could be a major player in Kansas’ energy future. Democratic Gov. Kathleen Sebelius says the state should try incentives for contractors to build more energy-efficient housing. The candidates in this fall’s governor’s race offer different ideas for future energy needs and generation in Kansas. But both agree on Kansas’s current situation: The status quo must change. Both say Kansas must seek to depend less on energy created outside the state. They say clean-burning energy should be a priority and agree that global warming is a concern.
1 Oct 2006

Officials show little interest in call for coal moratorium

TOPEKA - House Utilities Chairman Carl Holmes, R-Liberal, expects five coal-burning power plants planned for Kansas in the next few years will be the last built in the state, given federal concerns over global warming and air pollution. But Holmes doesn't see a need for a moratorium on the new plants as requested by the Sierra Club this week. "What do we gain by doing that?" he asked during a break at a state-led renewable energy conference in Topeka. "I don't see this state putting in tougher standards than what's already on at the federal level."
29 Sep 2006

Sierra Club asks Sebelius for moratorium on coal-fired plants

TOPEKA, Kan. - Sierra Club wants Gov. Kathleen Sebelius to prevent the construction of new coal-fired electric plants and appoint a commission to study their potential environmental effects. The request Tuesday from the group's Kansas chapter was a response to plans by Sunflower Electric Power Corp. to build three generating plants that burn coal to produce power outside Holcomb in southwest Kansas.
26 Sep 2006

Power potential - Kansas trailing other states in wind energy efforts

Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack challenged regulators and utility companies in his state a few years ago to produce 1,000 megawatts of renewable energy by 2010. The push, known as a renewable portfolio standard and other incentives, has helped develop Iowa into a national wind energy leader. With 135 giant wind turbines towering in the rural landscape of Wright and Hamilton counties and several other wind farms in north-central Iowa, the state has become the nation’s third-leading wind-energy producer behind Texas and California.
5 Sep 2006

Energy summit draws crowd to hear experts

Several audience members asked questions and made comments during the forum. Tyler McNeal, Stilwell, said the search for energy should not encroach on America's shrinking tall grass prairie, including in the Flint Hills of Kansas. "Tall grass prairie is considered one of the most important ecological systems in North America; that compares to the rain forest," McNeal said. "I'm concerned that this important, fragile ecosystem is threatened by the development, for instance, of industrial wind turbine complexes."
17 Aug 2006

Energy will be burning issue

Bill Griffith, chairman of the Sierra Club in Kansas, said conservation was the least costly form of new energy and held the most realistic potential for moderating short-term natural gas and electricity prices.
5 Jan 2006

Tom Hewson Analyses Carbon Dioxide Savings of Gray County Wind Farm (KS)

Given its location, Gray County would have displaced mostly NGCC and some oil fired generation. Using the average 2003 NGCC heatrate for the sub-powerpool (7,478 Btu/kWh) and the average CO2 content of natural gas (116 #CO2/MMBtu), the project may have displaced only 158,000 tons of CO2 in 2003 (0.00207% of 2003 US estimated emissions according to the USDOE report entitled Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2003 (issued December 13, 2004). (Note in 2002, the output was less and it would have displaced only 140,000 tons).
1 Jan 2005

Many Questions about Wind Must be Answered

All too often I hear an enthusiastic statement that wind generators will replace the power plant and become the singular source of our energy supply. Despite what the infrequent visitor to western Kansas may think, the wind does not always blow. Consumers want to turn on the television or do the wash at any time, illustrating that the demand for electricity is present even when the wind is not blowing.
1 Nov 2004

https://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Kansas&p=36&topic=Energy+Policy
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