Documents filed under Offshore Wind from Europe

Report on the impact on the fishing sector of offshore wind farms and other renewable energy systems

A-9-2021-0184_en_thumb In Europe, the North Sea, Baltic Sea and Atlantic hold more than 85 percent of existing offshore wind capacity. In total there are now 110 offshore wind facilities with over 5000 wind turbines in European waters representing 12,000 MW. Under EU-27, the European Commission expects at least 60,000 MW of operating offshore wind by 2030 and up to 300,000 GW in 2050. In this document recently adopted by the European Parliament, there is a clear recognition of land-use conflicts arising from energy development offshore particularly with regard to fishing. The member states lay out the risks and demands for more research and stress that offshore wind facilities "should only be built if the exclusion of negative environmental and ecological, as well as economic, socio-economic and socio-cultural impacts on fishers and aquaculture producers is guaranteed" and urges Member States to "continue working on the development and usage of other forms of renewable energy." A portion of the document is provided be low. The full document can be accessed at the document links on this page.
1 Jun 2021

RSPB comments re: Hornsea Three Development Consent Order

En010080-003105-the_royal_society_for_the_protection_of_birds_post-examination_submission_thumb The attached letter written by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds raises their concerns over Hornsea Project Three, an offshore wind project located in the North Sea. New information has arisen indicating that the project will adversely effect the breeding grounds of the gannet, kittiwake, and black-backed gull populations and negatively impact the integrity of the Flamborough and Filey Coast SPA. The Royal Society urges the Secretary of State to extend the deadline for the project's development order to consider this new information and recommends that alternative energy solutions be explored.
6 Sep 2019

RSPB comments re: Hornsea Three Development Consent Order

En010080-003105-the_royal_society_for_the_protection_of_birds_post-examination_submission_thumb The attached letter written by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds raises their concerns over Hornsea Project Three, an offshore wind project located in the North Sea. New information has arisen indicating that the project will adversely effect the breeding grounds of the gannet, kittiwake, and black-backed gull populations and negatively impact the integrity of the Flamborough and Filey Coast SPA. The Royal Society urges the Secretary of State to extend the deadline for the project's development order to consider this new information and recommends that alternative energy solutions be explored.
6 Sep 2019

Offshore wind strike prices: Behind the headlines

Offshorestrikeprice_thumb The new report prepared by economics professor Gordon Hughes, a former advisor to World Bank, Dr Capell Aris, a fellow of the IET, and Dr John Constable of the Global Warming Policy Forum, explains how the broad assumption that offshore wind prices are falling is not valid. Through a detailed statistical analysis of the data, covering 86 wind farms, the authors found that capital cost of offshore wind (£/MWh installed) is actually rising as a consequence of companies moving into deeper and deeper waters. The summary of the report is provided below. The full report can be downloaded from this page.
10 Nov 2017

Patterns of migrating soaring migrants indicate attraction to marine wind farms

Patterns_of_migrating_soaring_migrants_indicate_attraction_to_marine_wind_farms_thumb This important research identified that migrating raptor species tend to be attracted to offshore wind turbines and that the risk of colliding with wind turbines at sea is much greater than previously assumed. The abstract and resulting discussion of the paper are provided below. The full paper can be downloaded by clinking the links on this page. 
29 Nov 2016

Lack of sound science in assessing wind farm impacts on seabirds

Lack_of_sound_science_in_assessing_wf_impacts_seabirds-jpe12731_thumb This paper argues that the methods and data used when estimating effects of offshore wind turbines on seabird population rates and the potential impacts on seabird populations are grossly inadequate. As a result,  Environmental Impact Assessments cannot solely be relied on to report risks. The conclusions cited in the paper are provided below. The full paper can be accessed by clicking the links on this page. 
16 Sep 2016

Sound exposure in harbour seals during the installation of an offshore wind farm: predictions of auditory damage

Hastie_et_al-2015-journal_of_applied_ecology_thumb Scientists at the Sea Mammal Research Unit at the University of St Andrews tracked 24 harbor seals and their behavior while offshore wind turbines were being installed on the east coast of England, in 2012. They predicted that half of the seals tracked received sound levels from pile driving that exceeded auditory damage thresholds. The results have implications for offshore industry and will be important for policymakers developing guidance for pile driving. A summary of the findings is provided below. The full paper can be accessed by clicking the links on this page.
1 May 2015

https://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Europe&topic=Offshore+Wind&type=Document
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