Articles filed under Energy Policy from Europe

Bias in Favour of Onshore Wind Farms will be to the Detriment of the Highland Landscape

“We believe the Scottish Executive should urgently produce in a transparent and consultative way an energy strategy for Scotland including the electricity distribution network. In this way, all relevant factors – social, environmental and economic – can be weighted up throughout Scotland. This would then provide a national framework for planning decisions allowing prioritisation of renewable energy development to less sensitive areas”.
23 Jan 2006

Google here, Dave, to see the price of wind power

Anyone who thinks that wind factories are environmentally friendly should Google "Cefn Croes Photo Gallery", to see 100 chilling pictures showing how many miles of unspoiled Welsh countryside were disfigured to create the largest industrial site in Britain: all to "save" annually less than a quarter of the CO2 emissions from a single jumbo jet.
22 Jan 2006

Residents angered by windfarm comments

RESIDENTS of Denby Dale and surrounding villages were astonished to read the statements by Caroline Lucas Euro-MP about wind energy. She seems to be one of a dwindling number still under the misapprehension that wind turbines are in any way "green".
20 Jan 2006

Amicus to call for new nuclear generators

“With renewable energy sources several decades away from providing more than a tiny minority of our energy needs, we urgently need government policy to promote clean coal to save thousands of jobs and avoid blackouts and soaring utility bills over the next five years.”
16 Jan 2006

Momentum grows for common EU energy policy

The union has also committed to increase the share of renewable sources in its energy mix, though some say that can be developed further. With North Sea oil sources depleting and gas getting expensive, "renewables" like biofuels or hydro power are seen as crucial to establishing more home-grown energy supplies.
12 Jan 2006

Wind Power - 'Variable' or 'Intermittent'? - A Problem Whatever the Word

A Research Into the Achilles' Heel of the Wind Industry. With a wealth of examples and references, Dr. Etherington enlightens us on the principal weakness of windfarms: their erratic, unpredictable production of electricity. A modern economy cannot afford blackouts, so wind power production must be backed up 24h a day by conventional power, which substantially reduces the C02 savings
1 Jan 2006

Wind not the answer to our energy needs

Dr Johannes Teyssen and Martin Fuchs, authors of a 2005 report into wind energy in Germany, also uncovered some disturbing truths. There are three points that resoundingly debunk the myth that wind energy is efficient and practical. First, the more wind farms Germany installs, the less effective it becomes in displacing other generators. Second, there are massive subsidy costs, extensive new power lines, back-up and cost requirements. Third, comments that 48,000 megawatts of wind energy will only effectively replace 2000 megawatts of conventional generators.
30 Dec 2005

Founded on a lie

An adjudication by the Advertising Standards Authority, released on 21 December, confirms that the wind power industry has duped the country, despite repeated warnings from critics. Every new development, most recently the outrageous approval of Glenmoriston at Loch Ness, is hailed as saving the emission of thousands of tonnes of a year.
28 Dec 2005

Danes have much to teach on green power - like how not to do it

Wind power has a defect: it only generates when there is a breeze, so it's no good for supplying peak electricity just when you need it. The Danes get around this problem by importing lots of electricity from Sweden and Germany, thereby passing the pollution problem to someone else, as well as quietly making use of Sweden's atomic stations. If the Danes didn't import electricity, they'd have to have more gas plants and so make even more emissions.
28 Dec 2005

Danes have much to teach on green power - like how not to do it

Wind power has a defect: it only generates when there is a breeze, so it's no good for supplying peak electricity just when you need it. The Danes get around this problem by importing lots of electricity from Sweden and Germany, thereby passing the pollution problem to someone else, as well as quietly making use of Sweden's atomic stations. If the Danes didn't import electricity, they'd have to have more gas plants and so make even more emissions.
28 Dec 2005

ASA Slashes Estimated CO2 Savings From Wind

Based on the grid average method, a typical 2 MW (100 metre, 228ft, high)wind turbine in the UK would save just 2,000 tonnes of CO2 per year, which is 230kg per hour on average. This hourly rate is equivalent to the hourly emissions of just two Heavy Duty Vehicles (125 kg per hour at 100 kph,according to the Highways Authority).
20 Dec 2005

https://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Europe&p=64&topic=Energy+Policy&type=Article
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