Articles filed under Technology from Europe

Total Sets Deadlines for Solar, Wind to be Viable

French oil company Total believes wind energy must prove it is competitive by 2020 and solar power must do the same by 2050 if they are to avoid being sidelined, it said on Tuesday. In France, Total aims to spend 500 million euros ($627 million) by 2010 on renewable energy sources, including 100 million euros in research and development partnerships. “For renewable energies to become viable we need to see significant technological progress over this period,” Gilles Cochevelou, head of renewable energy at Total, told Reuters on the sidelines of a conference. “But we will need all existing energy resources by 2050,” he said adding it was wrong at present to eliminate any single energy resource or push any single one forward.
25 Oct 2006

Power plant lowers carbon levels

power plant labelled one of the worst in the UK for pollution is to supply energy generated from wood shavings. The Didcot A station will now provide electricity for 100,000 homes created with the use of carbon-neutral fuels, as well as coal-fired power production. A new facility will use bio-mass fuels which absorb as much carbon dioxide when growing as they create when burnt.
13 Oct 2006

Home wind turbines turn fashionable

LONDON (Reuters) - A mere breath of a breeze disturbs the quiet of autumn in south London and the wind turbine on the gable of Donnachadh McCarthy's home turns lazily. The morning sun casts shadows from solar panels onto the walls of the house and filters through the windows into his living room. "I'm in surplus. I am now providing money to the grid," he said with a grin, gesturing at a red light winking on the wall that marks the progress of his domestic power station. "I have exported 20 percent more electricity than I've imported this year ... the average carbon footprint is 8.5 tonnes in the EU, whereas mine is less than half a tonne."
11 Oct 2006

Plan for eco-house welcomed

FOR most people, building a new home can be a bit of a challenge. With construction work to oversee, bathroom suites to choose and gardens to landscape, the work can seem never ending. But one Suffolk woman has much more than paint schemes at the top of her list of priorities. Virginia Neild, from Cowlinge, near Newmarket, is planning to create a house that is a friend to the environment, as well as her bank balance. Not only will it be so heavily insulated that there will be no need for central heating, Mrs Neild hopes to win permission from council planners to erect a 12-metre wind turbine to power most, or all, of her electricity.
4 Oct 2006

Is wind power just hot air?

The harsh truth is that money, rather than worries over global warming, is the only thing that will tempt the British to use alternative fuels en masse. And for the most part, the sums do not add up. Wind energy is a good example. Even the respected Centre for Alternative Technology (CAT) in Wales does not recommend roof-mounted wind turbines, such as that embraced by Mr Cameron. Wind speeds around many houses are low and erratic, while a turbine is noisy and can damage a building, it points out.
30 Sep 2006

Storing wind power

A new study is under way to ascertain and quantify the potential economic benefits of coupling vanadium redox batteries with wind farms in Ireland. Sustainable Energy Ireland (SEI) and Tapbury Management are funding the study, which will be carried out in collaboration with VRB Power Systems. VRB is a Canadian electrochemical energy storage company that patented and brought to market the Vanadium Redox Battery Energy Storage System.
29 Sep 2006

Green energy hope

A NORTH Devon man has criticised the Government for failing to help a project he believes would provide renewable energy solutions and a real alternative to wind turbines. Engineer Paul Hewitt of Bideford has spent the last two-and-a-half years developing a self-sufficient system driven by the principles of perpetual motion. Using only air and water, the Hydro Gravitizer would produce carbon-emission-free electricity 24-hours a day, seven days a week. It could replace coal and gas fired boilers in power stations, generate low noise levels and could even be installed underground. "This is the only renewable energy system that is continuous and relies on its own environment rather than external sources such as tidal flow or wind," Mr Hewitt told the Gazette.
14 Sep 2006

Harnessing the power of sea will demand economic muscle

PARIS As recently as two years ago, few energy analysts believed that ocean power - harvesting electricity from tides and waves - had a future. Offshore conditions seemed too harsh, the costs too high. The International Energy Agency, a Paris-based research body that advises western governments, dismissed the technology in one paragraph in a 570-page study of energy resources that it published in 2004, saying it was "still in its infancy." But with crude oil heading to $80 a barrel, interest - from both investors and researchers - has surged.
11 Sep 2006

Harnessing the power of sea will demand economic muscle

PARIS As recently as two years ago, few energy analysts believed that ocean power - harvesting electricity from tides and waves - had a future. Offshore conditions seemed too harsh, the costs too high. The International Energy Agency, a Paris-based research body that advises western governments, dismissed the technology in one paragraph in a 570-page study of energy resources that it published in 2004, saying it was "still in its infancy." But with crude oil heading to $80 a barrel, interest - from both investors and researchers - has surged.
11 Sep 2006

AW Energy Gets Power from the Ocean Floor

The plates will be anchored on the ocean floor near the shore, at a depth of a dozen meters. They are designed to capture the back-and-forth motion of underwater swells. The movement produces kinetic energy, which is collected by a piston pump and converted to electricity by more conventional generator systems onshore.
8 Sep 2006

New battery back-up windfarm

Smoothing the output of wind farms would revolutionise the industry and the Commission for Energy Regulation has taken a keen interest in the project. The equipment allows the turbine to store electricity in an electrolytic battery. This is then released during periods of low wind or when the grid is at peak demand.
2 Sep 2006

Off-shore 5M Wind Turbine Premier

For the first time, a five-megawatt wind turbine by REpower Systems AG (Prime Standard, WKN 617703) has been set up for the first time on the open sea. The first of a total of two turbines for the "Beatrice" demonstrator wind farm has just been set up on a lattice-like jacket structure, piled to the seabed at a depth of 44 metres in the Scottish North Sea, in the Moray Firth.
1 Sep 2006

Off-shore 5M Wind Turbine Premier

For the first time, a five-megawatt wind turbine by REpower Systems AG (Prime Standard, WKN 617703) has been set up for the first time on the open sea. The first of a total of two turbines for the "Beatrice" demonstrator wind farm has just been set up on a lattice-like jacket structure, piled to the seabed at a depth of 44 metres in the Scottish North Sea, in the Moray Firth.
1 Sep 2006

https://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Europe&p=5&topic=Technology&type=Article
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