Documents filed under Property Values from Europe

Gone with the Wind: Valuing the visual impacts of wind turbines through house prices

Sercdp0159_thumb Abstract This study provides quantitative evidence on the local benefits and costs of wind farm developments in England and Wales, focussing on their visual environmental impacts. In the tradition of studies in environmental, public and urban economics, housing costs are used to reveal local preferences for views of wind farm developments. Estimation is based on quasiexperimental research designs that compare price changes occurring in places where wind farms become visible, with price changes in appropriate comparator groups. These comparator groups include places close to wind farms that became visible in the past, or where they will become operational in the future and places close to wind farms sites but where the turbines are hidden by the terrain. All these comparisons suggest that wind farm visibility reduces local house prices, and the implied visual environmental costs are substantial. The conclusions of the report are provided below. The full report can be accessed by clicking the link(s) on this page.
11 Apr 2014

Gone with the wind: valuing the local impacts of wind turbines through house prices

Windfarmsandhousepricesnovember2013v5_thumb This research provides quantitative evidence of the local benefits and costs of wind farm developments in the United Kingdom. In the tradition of studies in environmental, public and urban economics, housing costs are used to reveal local preferences for wind farm development in England and Wales. The authors compared housing price changes in places close to wind farms when wind farms become operational with various comparator groups. These comparator groups include: places close to wind farms that became operational in the past, or where they will become operational in the future; places close to wind farms sites that were refused planning permission; places close to wind farms that are planned or proposed but are not yet operational; and places close to where wind farms became operational but where the turbines are hidden by the terrain. All these comparisons suggest that wind farm developments reduce local house prices. The findings of the paper are provided below. The full paper can be accessed by clicking the links on this page.
1 Nov 2013

The Vindication of Don Quixote: The impact of noise and visual pollution from wind turbines on local residents in Denmark

The_vindication_of_don_quixote_ifro_wp_2013_13_thumb This paper examines the negative impacts of turbine view and noise on the sale of residential properties. The authors conclude that "noise and visual pollution from wind turbines have a considerable impact on nearby residential properties." and that "local residents who live in close proximity to these sustainable giants experience some very real negative externalities in the form of noise and visual pollution." The abstract and conclusion of the paper are posted below. The full paper can be accessed by clicking the links on this page.
10 Sep 2013

The Impact of Wind Farms on Property Values: A Geographically Weighted Hedonic Pricing Model

Fcn_wp3_2012-pdf_thumb This paper examines the impacts of wind turbines on property values. The researchers look at distance and other factors, including visual effect and shadow flicker. The results found that property values were reduced particularly for properties within 1.5 kilometers of the turbines. The abstract and portions of the conclusion are provided below. The full paper can be accessed by clicking the links on this page.
2 Mar 2013

Julian and Jane Davis valuation appeal

Valuation_tribunals-davis_thumb In 2006, Mr Julian and Mrs Jane Davis' quiet enjoyment of their property had been disturbed by a nearby wind project to such an extent that they were forced to vacate their house, for health reasons. The Lincolnshire Valuation Tribune ruled that construction of the turbines 930 metres away from the dwellings had a significant negative effect on Davis; enjoyment of their properties, that the nuisance caused by the turbines was real and not imagined and it would have an effect on the potential sale price of the properties. Excerpts of the ruling are provided below. The full ruling can be accessed by clicking on the link(s) at the bottom of this page.
23 Oct 2010

Denmark: public policy regarding loss of value to real property due to wind turbines

Denmark_promotionrenewableenergyact_thumb Denmark adopted this policy in 2008-2009 which requires developers to pay compensation for loss of value of real property following the erection of the wind turbine. A summary of the policy is cited below. The policy document detailing the process of determining loss and compensation can be accessed by downloading the file linked to this page. This information was obtained from the Danish Energy Agency website.
1 Jan 2009

Noise Radiation from Wind Turbines Installed Near Homes: Effects on Health

Wtnoisehealth_thumb The important paper reviews research articles within the field of acoustics concerning the acoustic properties of wind turbines and noise and recommends a safe buffer zone of at least 2 km between turbines and residential dwellings. The abstract of this paper is provided below. The full document can be accessed by clicking the link(s) on this page.
1 Feb 2007

Social Assessment of Wind Power: Visual Effect and Noise From Windmills--Quantifying and Valuation

"The main idea of wind power is to produce electricity without air pollution and without using exhaustible natural resources. However, wind power involves certain costs. These costs are among other things due to the fact that windmills stand as a foreign element in the open landscape. Some people are of the opinion that windmills in an open landscape impinge on the recreative element of the landscape. In addition to this, windmills give off noise that, depending on the wind direction and distance from the windmill, can be a nuisance for those living in the vicinity. The purpose of this study is to evaluate how great the costs are from the visual effect and noise of the windmills. In order to make it possible to compare these costs with other costs and gains in relation to windmills, these costs are reckoned in cash terms. This has been done partly on the basis of the willingness to pay for getting rid of the windmills of people living in the vicinity (the interview method or contingent valuation), and partly using a survey of house prices in the vicinity of the windmills (the house price method or hedonic pricing) as a starting point."
2 Apr 2006

Impact of wind farms on the value of residential property and agricultural land

Windfarmsfinalreport_thumb Executive Summary -60% of the sample suggested that wind farms decrease the value of residential properties where the development is within view -67% of the sample indicated that the negative impact on property prices starts when a planning application to erect a wind farm is made -The main factors cited for the negative impact on property values are: o visual impact of wind farm after completion o fear of blight o the proximity of a property to a wind farm -Once a wind farm is completed, the negative impact on property values continues but becomes less severe after two years or so after completion ..... -The survey suggests that wind farms do not impact on residential property values in a uniform way. The circumstances of each development can be different -This report points to a need for further research to track the impact of wind farms and to examine in particular whether the nature of any adverse impact diminishes as wind farms become an increasingly familiar part of the rural scene.
1 Jan 2004

https://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Europe&p=11&topic=Property+Values&type=Document
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