Results for "fire" in Library filed under Energy Policy from Colorado

Xcel plans to double its renewable energy generation by 2030. It’ll cost consumers $8 billion to do it.

The centerpiece of the plan is a dramatic increase in renewables and storage, adding approximately 5,600 MW of new capacity. This includes 2,300 MW of wind power, 1,600 MW of large-scale solar projects and 400 MW of battery storage. Another 1,300 MW of distributed solar, such as community solar gardens, would also be added.
25 Feb 2021 search match:

Xcel does an end run on the legislature — with an assist from Colorado’s PUC

Xcel is employing creative accounting to make the CEP look affordable, which is why it didn’t pass the smell test with my most business- and energy-savvy colleagues in 2017. Flaws in the company’s analysis became apparent during CEP hearings, thanks to diligent watchdog work by third parties and ratepayer advocates. But the plan won approval despite those dubious underpinnings and the doubts of some PUC members.
20 Sep 2018 search match:

Our View: Clean Power Plan bad deal for state

The U.S. gets about 4 percent of its electricity from wind and solar power. The Clean Power Plan proposes increasing that proportion to 28 percent by 2030. A study of electric cost versus installed renewable capacity published by wattsupwiththat.com projects such an increase would actually amount to a quadrupling of consumer energy costs throughout the next 15 years, in many cases, further burdening those who are already struggling.
1 Nov 2015 search match:

Tri-State: $1 billion cost to meet Colorado's renewable-energy goal

The $1 billion figure covers the cost of new wind farms, natural gas power plants to provide power when the wind isn't blow and transmission lines, Dave Lock, Tri-State's senior manager for government relations told a new committee Wednesday. ...Colorado Attorney General John Suthers, said that "in a perfect world" the committee would have been convened to reach consensus on the issues a year ago.
11 Jul 2013 search match:

Local elected officials continue to slam renewable energy bill

"You're not promoting Colorado jobs. You're promoting jobs in other states where you can buy power to meet the mandate," Mathers said. "This bill provides no advantage to businesses in Colorado or promoting our economy." Perhaps the greatest injustice, Grobe said, is the fact hydroelectric power is absent among the bill's list of approved sources of renewable energy.
20 Apr 2013 search match:

Moving too fast on Colorado's renewable energy standard?

A Democratic bill to boost the renewable energy standard in rural Colorado is being rushed through the legislature. Its sponsors should slow down and consider making it less onerous. ...Because they weren't involved in drafting the bill, Tri-State quickly calculated it would cost them between $2 billion and $4 billion to meet the new standard.
9 Apr 2013 search match:

Did wind mandate worsen pollution?

"Cleaner air and cheaper energy" was the slogan when voters mandated wind and other renewable sources for 10 percent of the state's electric generation with Amendment 37 in 2004. Democratic legislators liked the idea so much that they upped the mandate to 20 percent in 2007 and boosted it this year to 30 percent. One small problem: Neither half of the slogan is true.
16 May 2010 search match:

Co-ops oppose more state regulation

Rural electric cooperative managers told the Public Utilities Commission on Thursday to keep its hands off their power supplier. Clean-energy advocates, however, urged the state to take a greater role in regulating Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association, saying the coal-heavy company's power plants affect everyone, not just its customers.
17 Jul 2009 search match:

Wind power could complicate electricity management

These days we read and hear more and more about the exponential increases in renewable energy, particularly large wind farms such as those sprouting up on Colorado's front range and eastern plains. Colorado's Amendment 37 requires the state's largest utility companies to produce 10 percent of their energy from renewable sources by 2015. A subsequent legislative action doubled that to 20 percent by 2020. ...This is all great news, right? Not if you are an independent grid system operator, and not if you're expecting all of this large scale wind power to help reduce global warming carbon emissions. Wind power is by nature a notoriously intermittent source of power. Wind simply doesn't blow steadily all of the time. Therefore, the power output of all large scale wind farms goes up and down dramatically throughout the day, regardless of the demand for power on the grid. ...Without energy diversity, the more renewable power we mandate, the more unreliable the grid will become. The laws of physics simply can't be amended.
21 May 2008 search match:

Report: Wind, solar power have limits

While there are some small hydroelectric generation projects in Colorado, the bulk of renewable energy is provided by wind turbines. Under the law, solar electric is required to meet at least 4 percent of the renewable energy for investor-owned utilities. "The problem is, the wind doesn't blow all the time and the sun doesn't shine all the time," said Gary Schmitz, chief economist for the Energy Forum. "The purpose of the study was to look at how many of these will we have to build to get that amount of energy." The answer is somewhere between 1,700 and 2,000 more wind turbines that produce between 1.5 and 2 megawatts each, or roughly five times current numbers. Solar capacity would have to increase about sixfold from current levels. Power providers say they can reach those levels without much economic disruption, although requiring larger amounts of renewable energy would begin to strain financial resources, Smith said.
15 Dec 2007 search match:

Pumping up the power grid

A new coal-burning electricity plant is under construction in Pueblo. To the north, in Frederick, work is under way on another electricity plant, this one fired by natural gas. Solar and wind farms are cropping up in Lamar, Peetz, Grover and the San Luis Valley.
29 Apr 2006 search match:

https://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Colorado&search=fire&topic=Energy+Policy
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