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Into the wind

HARWICH = Wind energy took a big step forward in Harwich when the planning board last Tuesday voted unanimously to grant Gerald Bojanowski a special permit to construct and operate a commercial wind turbine on the site of his business in an industrial-zoned part of town. The 123-foot turbine will supply energy to Bojanowski's public storage/locker company Depot Storage as well as to other businesses in the same building at 500 Depot St., North Harwich. The turbine will have a 30-year lifespan, he added.

HARWICH = Wind energy took a big step forward in Harwich when the planning board last Tuesday voted unanimously to grant Gerald Bojanowski a special permit to construct and operate a commercial wind turbine on the site of his business in an industrial-zoned part of town.

The 123-foot turbine will supply energy to Bojanowski's public storage/locker company Depot Storage as well as to other businesses in the same building at 500 Depot St., North Harwich. The turbine will have a 30-year lifespan, he added.

A zoning bylaw that allows wind energy systems to be developed on commercial and industrial sites passed at the Harwich annual town meeting in May, and must still be approved by the attorney general. The 20-kilowatt energy system meets the town's standards as written in the bylaw, which is a 25-kilowatt limit, and a maximum height of 150 feet.

"I've done a lot of due diligence on this - it doesn't even register on the scale of large-scale wind turbines that do have some issues," Bojanowski told the planning board at his permit hearing June 12.

Bojanowski assured the planning board the noise levels from the turbine would be within 35 to 40 decibels and would lessen as distance from the turbine... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

HARWICH = Wind energy took a big step forward in Harwich when the planning board last Tuesday voted unanimously to grant Gerald Bojanowski a special permit to construct and operate a commercial wind turbine on the site of his business in an industrial-zoned part of town.

The 123-foot turbine will supply energy to Bojanowski's public storage/locker company Depot Storage as well as to other businesses in the same building at 500 Depot St., North Harwich. The turbine will have a 30-year lifespan, he added.

A zoning bylaw that allows wind energy systems to be developed on commercial and industrial sites passed at the Harwich annual town meeting in May, and must still be approved by the attorney general. The 20-kilowatt energy system meets the town's standards as written in the bylaw, which is a 25-kilowatt limit, and a maximum height of 150 feet.

"I've done a lot of due diligence on this - it doesn't even register on the scale of large-scale wind turbines that do have some issues," Bojanowski told the planning board at his permit hearing June 12.

Bojanowski assured the planning board the noise levels from the turbine would be within 35 to 40 decibels and would lessen as distance from the turbine increases.

"At 550 feet away you're not going to hear it at all. You may hear the car crusher next door or the dogs barking from the kennel. You may hear the noise from Stone Wood from the trucks and backing up of forklifts but you're not going to hear this tower," Bojanowski said.

The town's wind turbine height limit of 150 feet was set after a consultant's report in January concluded that nearly 90 percent of the town was effectively off limits to turbines over 200 feet tall due to Federal Aviation Administration regulations governing flight paths into Chatham Municipal Airport.

Assistant town planner Elizabeth Hude assured the board that the height of Bojanowski's proposed turbine doesn't conflict with those regulations, but will trigger some red tape at the state level, because it will exceed 30 feet.

"You'll need to file a form, what they'll do is look at your project and they'll say ‘yes or no' if you need to put a light on it and that requires a review," Hude said.

Before the turbine can go up, Bojanowski needs a building permit from the town and must file paperwork with NSTAR and the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative. At this point though, the biggest hurdle is attorney general approval of the town meeting bylaw, expected sometime in August.

In an interview following the meeting, Bojanowski said the estimated wholesale cost of the turbine would be around $75,000, but that amount will be significantly lowered since he will install it himself.

Bojanowski is a licensed general contractor.

"It's like personal training for me to learn first hand what it's about because in the future I'd like to do larger-scale projects somewhere else," Bojanowski said. That somewhere else would ideally be an appropriately sited offshore spot, he added.

Bojanowski said he strongly urged the planning board to create a bylaw for commercial wind energy.

"I forced the bylaw. I went to the planning board and to use their words, ‘pushed them through the door,'" Bojanowski said. The installation of the turbine is planned for early September.



Source: http://www.townonline.com/h...

JUN 21 2007
https://www.windaction.org/posts/9598-into-the-wind
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