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State may delay new wind farms

A bill proposed in the state Senate would put an 18-month hold on new wind farm projects in Madison County and the rest of the state.

WAMPSVILLE - A bill proposed in the state Senate would put an 18-month hold on new wind farm projects in Madison County and the rest of the state.

While it wouldn't affect the Munnsville Wind Project under construction, it could delay other proposed projects.

"There's another one in the permitting stage that would run down through northwest Stockbridge and northeast Smithfield, that would be stopped in its tracks until 2009," said Jack Miller, Madison County's planning director. That project is being proposed by a company called AES, a global power company with headquarters in Arlington, Va.

He said that Green Power Energy is considering a project in the southern end of Fenner, near the existing one.

According to Miller there have also been discussions between Empire State Wind Energy, of Oneida, and the towns of DeRuyter, Georgetown and possibly Nelson.

"If something were to develop between them, a moratorium would be an obstacle," he said.

While the moratorium doesn't kill the projects entirely, it does put a hold on them and Miller fears that wouldn't be good for the industry.

"It would put a real damper on enthusiasm for... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

WAMPSVILLE - A bill proposed in the state Senate would put an 18-month hold on new wind farm projects in Madison County and the rest of the state.

While it wouldn't affect the Munnsville Wind Project under construction, it could delay other proposed projects.

"There's another one in the permitting stage that would run down through northwest Stockbridge and northeast Smithfield, that would be stopped in its tracks until 2009," said Jack Miller, Madison County's planning director. That project is being proposed by a company called AES, a global power company with headquarters in Arlington, Va.

He said that Green Power Energy is considering a project in the southern end of Fenner, near the existing one.

According to Miller there have also been discussions between Empire State Wind Energy, of Oneida, and the towns of DeRuyter, Georgetown and possibly Nelson.

"If something were to develop between them, a moratorium would be an obstacle," he said.

While the moratorium doesn't kill the projects entirely, it does put a hold on them and Miller fears that wouldn't be good for the industry.

"It would put a real damper on enthusiasm for developing Upstate New York," he said.

The following justification for the moratorium is given in the bill:

"Although the recent growth of the wind industry is welcomed by many in New York, local authorities and residents in wind-rich counties are concerned about their ability to address existing or anticipated proposals from wind energy developers interested in installing projects within their jurisdiction. With modern wind turbines standing between 200 and 400 feet tall, wind energy projects can have a major impact on the surrounding area. These wind energy production facilities have the potential of causing a significant negative impact on the scenic and historic character of our highways and byways."

Sen. David Valesky said he hasn't heard much support for the bill around the Capitol.

"I'm definitely opposed to this piece of legislation which would impose a moratorium on any siting of new windmill projects," he said. "I can't imagine why we'd want to be having a moratorium on projects that certainly we in Madison County know have great potential in terms of our energy future."

The board of supervisors agrees with Miller and Valesky's opposition of the bill and voted unanimously to pass a resolution that states it.

Copies of the resolution will now be forwarded to the appropriate legislators.

A resolution was also passed to support Reality Check's efforts to minimize tobacco advertising in local retail establishments.

"The project is about removing, reducing and repositioning tobacco advertisements in stores," said Lizzy Swoboda, of Bard College. She showed the board a picture of candy machines placed next to a cigarette case at a market in Oneida. She said the displays have since been repositioned.

The resolution won't have any legal ramifications for stores, but shows the board's support of Reality Check and "calls on retailers to reduce overall tobacco advertising in their place of business and to eliminate tobacco advertising from areas likely to be seen by children, including wall space below five feet, near candy displays, on countertops."

An agreement with Honeywell for the telemedicine demonstration project was also approved. The Madison County Health Department was selected to receive a grant of $83,950 to cover the cost of the equipment.

"The home care division can actually monitor patients at home without having to send a nurse out to visit. They can measure blood pressure and other vital statistics," said Smithfield Supervisor Richard Bargabos.

The board of supervisors approved the addition of a temporary part-time position in the Department of Solid Waste and Sanitation and a temporary full-time position in the Department of Social Services.

The part-time solid waste operator will be for the summer season and will be for up to 25 hours a week at $10.50 an hour. The money is to come out of the Solid Waste Department's 2007 budget.

Once Social Welfare Examiner Betty Armstrong retires, the Department of Social Services would like to hire a temporary replacement for her through the Home Energy Assistance Program season.

The permanent full-time position will be eliminated. The temporary full-time examiner position is to be paid $13.17 Oct. 15 through April 15.


┬ęThe Oneida Daily Dispatch 2007



Source: http://www.oneidadispatch.c...

JUN 13 2007
https://www.windaction.org/posts/9451-state-may-delay-new-wind-farms
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