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Swampscott OKs wind power studies

SWAMPSCOTT - Studies will get under way to determine whether four sites in town would be suitable for wind turbines.

At the urging of Renewable Energy Commission Chairman Lawrence Block, selectmen unanimously approved wind power feasibility studies at Forest Avenue, the Phillips Park pumping station, Stanley School and Jackson Park.

If the sites appear to promising, test wind turbines equipped with an anemometer and other devices used to measure velocity, constancy and other factors could be erected on those sites.

Block said he expects the site reviews to get under way before spring and if everything proceeds as planned and the sites look promising, the test towers, which are more than 100 feet tall, could be installed as early as this fall.

The test-towers would stay in place for one year, testing the wind speeds and the results could help determine whether the sites are suitable for an electricity-generating wind turbine similar to the one that stands at the tip of Hull.

Town Administrator Andrew Maylor endorsed the idea.

"To not explore these kinds of opportunities would be a mistake," Maylor said.

If, after the yearlong study, the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative and the University of Massachusetts determine a wind turbine is economically feasible based upon test results at the four locations, the next step... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  
At the urging of Renewable Energy Commission Chairman Lawrence Block, selectmen unanimously approved wind power feasibility studies at Forest Avenue, the Phillips Park pumping station, Stanley School and Jackson Park.

If the sites appear to promising, test wind turbines equipped with an anemometer and other devices used to measure velocity, constancy and other factors could be erected on those sites.

Block said he expects the site reviews to get under way before spring and if everything proceeds as planned and the sites look promising, the test towers, which are more than 100 feet tall, could be installed as early as this fall.

The test-towers would stay in place for one year, testing the wind speeds and the results could help determine whether the sites are suitable for an electricity-generating wind turbine similar to the one that stands at the tip of Hull.

Town Administrator Andrew Maylor endorsed the idea.

"To not explore these kinds of opportunities would be a mistake," Maylor said.

If, after the yearlong study, the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative and the University of Massachusetts determine a wind turbine is economically feasible based upon test results at the four locations, the next step is convincing town officials and residents it is in the best interest of the town to install the wind turbines.

Block said there would be no cost to the town for the studies and test towers but the town would be responsible for the cost of any wind turbines.

"One wind turbine would cost approximately $2 million," he said.

Block said it most economical to place the wind turbines near energy consuming sources instead of selling any electricity that is produced back to the power companies.

"Wind turbines can save town millions (of dollars)," Block said.

Block said the Renewable Energy Commission is also conducting a town wide energy audit and applying for renewable energy grants.

Source: http://www.thedailyitemofly...

JAN 11 2006
https://www.windaction.org/posts/943-swampscott-oks-wind-power-studies
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