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Altered images!

Gamesa Project Manager Nick Sage admitted that display photos featured at the exhibition had been altered.

The proposed windfarm and solar scheme would come within a few hundred metres of farms, family homes, and holiday accommodation - but some locals feel its true dimensions were underplayed in the display in order to make the plans more appealing to the public.

"Its all clever marketing", said Robert Rankin, joint owner of the Whitecairn Caravan Park, near Glenluce.

"The photo they showed at the exhibition had obviously been cropped along the top, and lengthened, to make the site look further away that it really is. I wouldn't be surprised if the photo had been manipulated in some way."

Gamesa Project Manager Nick Sage admitted that display photos featured at the exhibition had been altered.

He told the Gazette: "I take that point. To be honest, I think some mistakes were made. To give a true reflection of the site, we would have had to made the photo about ten metres high. The eye sees much further than the camera lens."

Mr Sage added that the final image was computer generated, and that Scottish Natural Heritage had advised them on how to present it.

Meanwhile, opinion continues to be divided about whether the Glenluce area should host a second windfarm, and its solar panel... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

The proposed windfarm and solar scheme would come within a few hundred metres of farms, family homes, and holiday accommodation - but some locals feel its true dimensions were underplayed in the display in order to make the plans more appealing to the public.

"Its all clever marketing", said Robert Rankin, joint owner of the Whitecairn Caravan Park, near Glenluce.

"The photo they showed at the exhibition had obviously been cropped along the top, and lengthened, to make the site look further away that it really is. I wouldn't be surprised if the photo had been manipulated in some way."

Gamesa Project Manager Nick Sage admitted that display photos featured at the exhibition had been altered.

He told the Gazette: "I take that point. To be honest, I think some mistakes were made. To give a true reflection of the site, we would have had to made the photo about ten metres high. The eye sees much further than the camera lens."

Mr Sage added that the final image was computer generated, and that Scottish Natural Heritage had advised them on how to present it.

Meanwhile, opinion continues to be divided about whether the Glenluce area should host a second windfarm, and its solar panel scheme.

Ray Dyer, of the Kelvin House Hotel in Glenluce, fears people may discouraged from visiting the area if the wind farm goes ahead.

He said:"The main problem with wind farms is that they're so visible. People who are driving into the area might be put off."

Alan Cowan, of Brambles Bistro in Glenluce, was also worried about potential impacts on visitor numbers.

Less tourists in the caravan park would consequently mean less tourists in the town, he claimed, with local businesses feeling the effects of reduced trade.

He said: "If tourists decided to go elsewhere, we would lose three or four customers every week of the summer. It's not the biggest village in the world, so we need these people."

Mr Cowan was questioned why the proposed renewable energy plant should be so close to local homes and businesses.

He said: "The whole of Scotland is covered in hills. There are lots of place where a wind farm wouldn't affect anybody. If all they need is a windy hill, there are surely not that many shortages in Scotland."

But other residents were all in favour of the green energy scheme. Sandra Kennedy, of the Rowantree Guest House in Glenluce put her support fully behind the windfarm and solar project.

She said: "I'm all for wind farms. It's the best option for the environment. We're going to run out of gas and oil in a few years. We've got to find some other way, don't we?"

Gamesa's Nick Sage was well aware that finding a suitable site was one thing, but getting the go ahead was a different matter entirely.

He said: "We are heavily restricted by planning laws. Many potential sites are in protected areas of national park. We have to follow guidelines and face many other hurdles before a site is accepted."
Gamesa's promises of job opportunities at the wind farm was given short shrift Mr Rankin at Whitecairn Caravan Park.

He said: "I'm sure there won't be jobs created. The guy that looks after Artfield is based in Perth. That's not very local".

But Mr Sage insisted local goods and services would be used for up to 25% of the construction process.

On long term job opportunities, however, he refused to be drawn. Although stating it was Gamesa's "preference" to employ locally, he admitted it would depend wholly upon the skill base available in the area.

Following their exhibition last week in Glenluce Public Hall, Gamesa yesterday released figures detailing local opinion of alternative energy.
Gathered from questionnaires distributed at the exhibition, they show a 89% of respondents support renewable energy, with 83% agreeing that Dumfries and Galloway is well suited for windfarms.

However, popular support for renewable energy was expressed side by side with concerns the effect on tourism.


Source: http://www.gallowaygazette....

DEC 24 2005
https://www.windaction.org/posts/814-altered-images
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