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Disfiguration of the landscape by wind turbines is undoubted

The disfiguration of the landscape by the sinister, silent wind turbines is undoubted. A vast army of the rotors will be needed to get anywhere near replacing the output of the nuclear plants, and the desire of environmentalists to replace nuclear and fossil fuel sources of energy with renewables increasingly looks like an impossible dream.

ALL over Scotland anger is mounting about the onward march of supposedly environmentally-friendly power projects which will dramatically alter the Scottish landscape.


The Cairngorms National Park Authority is objecting to a proposed 34-turbine wind farm development at Tomatin, following its opposition to similar plans at Strathnairn and Kildrummy which were deemed inappropriate. Meanwhile, more than 4500 local people have lodged their opposition to a huge wind farm in Lewis and there has been a high-profile campaign against the powerline set to scar the countryside from Beauly to Denny to bring power from renewable sources in the Highlands to the Central Belt.

Joining these protests is celebrity botanist David Bellamy, who has been enlisted for the battle against the 18 turbines set to be erected on Auchencorth Moss near Penicuik, a bog with some of the rarest forms of plant life in Europe.

With around 50 per cent of Scotland's present electricity needs met by the nuclear power stations at Torness and Hunterston, Scotland faces a massive energy problem once those generators close down and, although extending the life of Torness buys more time, tough decisions will need to be made in the very near... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  
ALL over Scotland anger is mounting about the onward march of supposedly environmentally-friendly power projects which will dramatically alter the Scottish landscape.


The Cairngorms National Park Authority is objecting to a proposed 34-turbine wind farm development at Tomatin, following its opposition to similar plans at Strathnairn and Kildrummy which were deemed inappropriate. Meanwhile, more than 4500 local people have lodged their opposition to a huge wind farm in Lewis and there has been a high-profile campaign against the powerline set to scar the countryside from Beauly to Denny to bring power from renewable sources in the Highlands to the Central Belt.

Joining these protests is celebrity botanist David Bellamy, who has been enlisted for the battle against the 18 turbines set to be erected on Auchencorth Moss near Penicuik, a bog with some of the rarest forms of plant life in Europe.

With around 50 per cent of Scotland's present electricity needs met by the nuclear power stations at Torness and Hunterston, Scotland faces a massive energy problem once those generators close down and, although extending the life of Torness buys more time, tough decisions will need to be made in the very near future before the country runs the danger of grinding to a halt.

The disfiguration of the landscape by the sinister, silent wind turbines is undoubted. A vast army of the rotors will be needed to get anywhere near replacing the output of the nuclear plants, and the desire of environmentalists to replace nuclear and fossil fuel sources of energy with renewables increasingly looks like an impossible dream.

Further, one of the few assets Scotland can rely on not to be outsourced to the Far East is our countryside and heritage, which would be irreparably damaged if wild moors like Auchencorth are dominated by wind farms, as has already happened near Soutra.

The environmental lobby is caught on the horns of a dilemma: the desire to avoid nuclear power is understandable, but so too should it be counterbalanced by the potential for alternatives to wreck our natural heritage.

The fear of a repeat of the Chernobyl disaster at one of our nuclear plants is also understandable, but the difference in safety records of virtually any Soviet industry compared to ours is vast. The British nuclear industry has had an excellent safety record since the 1957 Windscale fire, as evidenced by the swift action at Torness last night, and its ability to deliver power efficiently for many, many years can no longer be overlooked.

Although much of Prime Minister Tony Blair's credibility has been diminished, on this issue he is absolutely right. Correctly monitored, nuclear power is the best bet for the preservation of our vital natural assets.


Source: http://edinburghnews.scotsm...

DEC 23 2005
https://www.windaction.org/posts/810-disfiguration-of-the-landscape-by-wind-turbines-is-undoubted
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