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NSP chases after more green power

Nova Scotia Power is pledging to generate more green electricity after failing to meet its own voluntary targets this year. The province’s largest electrical utility is promising to add 130 megawatts of additional renewable energy by the end of 2009, enough to supply the power needs of 40,000 homes. But this latest commitment, announced Tuesday in Halifax by NSP president Ralph Tedesco, comes after the utility admitted it has been unable to meet its year-end target of producing 100 megawatts of energy through sources such as the wind, sun, tides and biomass. NSP is blaming the shortfall on a stalled wind project in Amherst that announced Friday it was unable to proceed with its 19-tower wind farm because of the rising cost of turbines and the end of a federal subsidy program.

Utility falls short of its target on alternative energy

Nova Scotia Power is pledging to generate more green electricity after failing to meet its own voluntary targets this year.

The province’s largest electrical utility is promising to add 130 megawatts of additional renewable energy by the end of 2009, enough to supply the power needs of 40,000 homes.

But this latest commitment, announced Tuesday in Halifax by NSP president Ralph Tedesco, comes after the utility admitted it has been unable to meet its year-end target of producing 100 megawatts of energy through sources such as the wind, sun, tides and biomass.

NSP is blaming the shortfall on a stalled wind project in Amherst that announced Friday it was unable to proceed with its 19-tower wind farm because of the rising cost of turbines and the end of a federal subsidy program.

"That was substantially it," Mr. Tedesco told reporters.

"We had one of the major developers caught between the so-called wind incentive expiring, as well as the increase in the price of machines."

Ottawa recently announced the cancellation of the wind power production incentive, which sparked expansion of the wind-power sector, offering a subsidy of at least one cent... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

Utility falls short of its target on alternative energy
 

Nova Scotia Power is pledging to generate more green electricity after failing to meet its own voluntary targets this year.

The province’s largest electrical utility is promising to add 130 megawatts of additional renewable energy by the end of 2009, enough to supply the power needs of 40,000 homes.

But this latest commitment, announced Tuesday in Halifax by NSP president Ralph Tedesco, comes after the utility admitted it has been unable to meet its year-end target of producing 100 megawatts of energy through sources such as the wind, sun, tides and biomass.

NSP is blaming the shortfall on a stalled wind project in Amherst that announced Friday it was unable to proceed with its 19-tower wind farm because of the rising cost of turbines and the end of a federal subsidy program.

"That was substantially it," Mr. Tedesco told reporters.

"We had one of the major developers caught between the so-called wind incentive expiring, as well as the increase in the price of machines."

Ottawa recently announced the cancellation of the wind power production incentive, which sparked expansion of the wind-power sector, offering a subsidy of at least one cent per kilowatt to independent producers.

Mr. Tedesco hopes the 31-megawatt wind farm Acciona Canada is developing just outside Amherst will put in another bid under NSP’s latest request for proposals.

"We are actually looking forward to Acciona bidding in this next round and think it will go forward," he said. "Nova Scotia Power’s customers want clean, green energy in a way that works for our province," he said, adding that technical details of the solicitation of bids will be provided in January.

Some wind developers have complained about the price NSP has been paying for wind-generated electricity. The utility pays 6.5 to 7.2 cents per kilowatt hour.

Mr. Tedesco said in the latest round of bidding, developers will submit a price to be paid for the green energy.

Environmentalist Brendan Haley said NSP will continue to miss its targets unless the province brings in legislation with consequences for the utility.

"Instead of voluntary targets that NSP keeps missing, the provincial government has to make a commitment to introduce tough government regulations," said Mr. Haley of the Ecology Action Centre in Halifax.

The province recently introduced draft regulations to force NSP to increase the amount of renewable energy being generated in the province.

The utility warned of higher power bills if it’s forced to comply with the new government targets requiring NSP to produce at least 20 per cent of its power from wind, solar and tidal power and other sources by 2013.

The Halifax-based utility now generates about 10 per cent of its electricity from renewable sources.

"The timing and quantity proposed in the draft regulations will result in increased costs to the electricity customers of NSPI," the utility wrote Nov. 10 in a brief to the Energy Department.

NSP says it could cost more than $1.1 billion to buy new wind turbines to increase the amount of electricity generated by wind and another $30 million to $60 million per year to operate them. And the utility expects to shell out $23 million more for natural gas to operate its gas-fired combustion turbines as backup power in case of a lull in wind power.

Mr. Tedesco said despite the setback in Amherst, NSP added 60 megawatts of renewable energy this year, providing enough electricity for 18,000 homes.

One potential supplier of wind-generated electricity was ecstatic to hear that NSP is looking to buy more renewable energy, including wind power, from independent producers.

It’s encouraging news from the province’s only customer for wind-generated electricity, said Mike Magnus, president of Shear Wind Energy of Halifax.

While Shear Wind is working on a wind project in Alberta, and is also a joint partner on four projects in Nova Scotia with Renewable Energy Services Ltd., it will submit a proposal for its own wind project in Nova Scotia under NSP’s new request, said Mr. Magnus.

( jmyrden@herald.ca)


Source: http://thechronicleherald.c...

DEC 20 2006
https://www.windaction.org/posts/6416-nsp-chases-after-more-green-power
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