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Fighting to preserve 'untouched' Snowy Plains

The Jardine family has owned their property at Snowy Plain for generations. David Jardine is the fifth generation of his family to own the land and his young grandson should be the seventh.

The family's hut, which has stood for more than 100 years, looks across a valley and up onto a ridge.
The wind farm development application has been approved by Snowy River Shire Council. If built, will stand on the ridge across the valley from, and in direct view of, their hut.
"It's untouched country," Jodi Jardine said.
"My husband and I feel that we are caretakers of the country."
In the past 10 days Jodi has formed a petition against the wind farms, which she has over 100 signatures on.
"It may be a bit late, but I just never thought it would be approved, on heritage issues alone.
"Never in a million years would I have thought in a heritage area like Snowy Plain they'd allow something like that."
Jodi is concerned the wind farms will do irreversible damage to the fragile landscape.
"They say that in 25 to 30 years they'll (the wind turbines) be pulled down, but we don't have crystal balls."
Jodi is concerned that with the emergence of solar power and new technologies, the wind farms might be obsolete in 10 years, yet the region will be stuck with the turbines.
Jodi is also concerned about the long lasting... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  
The family's hut, which has stood for more than 100 years, looks across a valley and up onto a ridge.
The wind farm development application has been approved by Snowy River Shire Council. If built, will stand on the ridge across the valley from, and in direct view of, their hut.
"It's untouched country," Jodi Jardine said.
"My husband and I feel that we are caretakers of the country."
In the past 10 days Jodi has formed a petition against the wind farms, which she has over 100 signatures on.
"It may be a bit late, but I just never thought it would be approved, on heritage issues alone.
"Never in a million years would I have thought in a heritage area like Snowy Plain they'd allow something like that."
Jodi is concerned the wind farms will do irreversible damage to the fragile landscape.
"They say that in 25 to 30 years they'll (the wind turbines) be pulled down, but we don't have crystal balls."
Jodi is concerned that with the emergence of solar power and new technologies, the wind farms might be obsolete in 10 years, yet the region will be stuck with the turbines.
Jodi is also concerned about the long lasting the damage caused putting the turbines up, such as widening roads.
The land has already been devastated by the January 2003 bushfires.
She said the wind farm company say they will fix any damage caused, but the vegetation is slow growing and not easily replaced.
Jodi agrees with Snowy River Shire Councillor, Jim Buckley's argument that the region has already done enough for green energy with the Snowy Scheme.
"I wouldn't undo it (the Snowy Scheme), it has been the greatest thing for tourism, but it won't be the same with wind farms.
"People leave cities and come to areas like this for the peace and quiet."
Jodi is also concerned that the council approved the wind farm before they established a wind farm policy, which is still being worked on.
The wind farm company, Taurus Energy, approached the Jardines at the end of last year, about putting a wind turbine on their land.
Jodi said the company said the family would benefit by having a wind farm because then national parks wouldn't want their land.
"If they're not going to let them into national parks, they (council) shouldn't approve them here."
Jodi said Taurus were "a bit hedgy" about how much money the family would be paid for hosting the wind farm, but Jodi got the impression that is was between $8000 and $10,000 per tower, per year. They were looking to put four to six towers on the Jardine's land.
"That's a lot of money to knock back in the middle of Australia's worse drought.
"But money can't replace everything and what we've got here can't be replaced."
Jodi's children have been droving cattle on their land since they were old enough to sit a horse.
Jodi said there aren't many places that still do all their mustering on horseback.
They spent all their holidays up there.
"We want our grandson to see and do what his father, grandfather and great grandfather have seen and done, but he won't be able to do that.
"I just never in a million years would have thought this would happen.
"But it has and now we have to deal with it.
"It's going to be hard to explain to future generations why this was done."

Source: http://cooma.yourguide.com....

DEC 8 2005
https://www.windaction.org/posts/639-fighting-to-preserve-untouched-snowy-plains
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