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Take a letter: But will SEC read it?

What does it say about New Hampshire government priorities that it adds a new and unnecessary office (see related editorial today) but can’t provide its Site Evaluation Committee with someone to open the mail and inform the public about public hearings?

What does it say about New Hampshire government priorities that it adds a new and unnecessary office (see related editorial today) but can’t provide its Site Evaluation Committee with someone to open the mail and inform the public about public hearings?

The site committee is of no small importance, as residents in and around Antrim have discovered in trying to deal with a large-scale windmill project. The SEC approved the project, with stipulations. But it then waived those stipulations at the Canadian windmill company’s request during a November hearing. Some neighbors were not heard on the matter, in part because they weren’t properly notified of the hearing. John Robertson, chairman of the Antrim select board, said earlier this month that the board intends to write a letter to the SEC voicing public concerns over noise and flashing lights. But who will read such a letter? Chairman Robertson said the SEC had lost an administrative position, “If you write a letter to the SEC, there’s no one to receive the letter,” he said.

He thinks the SEC needs to be able to communicate with the public, especially as more renewable energy... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

What does it say about New Hampshire government priorities that it adds a new and unnecessary office (see related editorial today) but can’t provide its Site Evaluation Committee with someone to open the mail and inform the public about public hearings?

The site committee is of no small importance, as residents in and around Antrim have discovered in trying to deal with a large-scale windmill project. The SEC approved the project, with stipulations. But it then waived those stipulations at the Canadian windmill company’s request during a November hearing. Some neighbors were not heard on the matter, in part because they weren’t properly notified of the hearing. John Robertson, chairman of the Antrim select board, said earlier this month that the board intends to write a letter to the SEC voicing public concerns over noise and flashing lights. But who will read such a letter? Chairman Robertson said the SEC had lost an administrative position, “If you write a letter to the SEC, there’s no one to receive the letter,” he said.

He thinks the SEC needs to be able to communicate with the public, especially as more renewable energy projects come before it.

“We’re going to need more renewable energy facilities, but the committee needs assistance in order to do the job,” Robertson said. Seems reasonable to us.


Source: https://www.unionleader.com...

APR 14 2021
https://www.windaction.org/posts/52292-take-a-letter-but-will-sec-read-it
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