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Wind energy projects' effects on wildlife to be discussed

Copeland will examine the current and expected status of wind projects in the West, as well as the leading science on their impacts to wildlife species including eagles, bats and songbirds. 

The large footprint created by wind energy projects raises ecological concerns for many wildlife species — and opportunities to lessen impacts to wildlife through careful site planning, according to Holly Copeland, director of science for The Nature Conservancy's Wyoming Chapter.

Copeland will speak at the next Draper Natural History Museum Lunchtime Expeditionabout "Smart Siting: The first step in minimizing impacts of wind energy for wildlife."

The free talk takes place on Thursday, Sept. 6, at 12:15 p.m. in the Buffalo Bill Center of the West’s Coe Auditorium in Cody, Wyoming.

Copeland will examine the current and expected status of wind projects in the West, as well as the leading science on their impacts to wildlife species including eagles, bats and songbirds. She concludes by discussing a tool, developed by TNC and its partners, to provide siting guidance and support for decision-makers and companies seeking to lessen the impacts of wind energy on wildlife.

“Across the West the number of installed and planned wind energy projects has sharply risen with growing interest in reducing fossil fuels to... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

The large footprint created by wind energy projects raises ecological concerns for many wildlife species — and opportunities to lessen impacts to wildlife through careful site planning, according to Holly Copeland, director of science for The Nature Conservancy's Wyoming Chapter.

Copeland will speak at the next Draper Natural History Museum Lunchtime Expeditionabout "Smart Siting: The first step in minimizing impacts of wind energy for wildlife."

The free talk takes place on Thursday, Sept. 6, at 12:15 p.m. in the Buffalo Bill Center of the West’s Coe Auditorium in Cody, Wyoming.

Copeland will examine the current and expected status of wind projects in the West, as well as the leading science on their impacts to wildlife species including eagles, bats and songbirds. She concludes by discussing a tool, developed by TNC and its partners, to provide siting guidance and support for decision-makers and companies seeking to lessen the impacts of wind energy on wildlife.

“Across the West the number of installed and planned wind energy projects has sharply risen with growing interest in reducing fossil fuels to mitigate climate change and support energy independence,” Copeland said in a press release.

In Wyoming, that translates into 1,500 megawatts of wind energy installed to date, with 8,000 megawatts of additional projects planned.


Source: https://billingsgazette.com...

AUG 24 2018
https://www.windaction.org/posts/48705-wind-energy-projects-effects-on-wildlife-to-be-discussed
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