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High levels of energy production and low consumption have helped to give Denmark an energy surplus

A twin national focus on renewable energy and reduced consumption - combined with North Sea oil reserves, have helped to make Denmark the only EU country not reliant on imported energy, according to the latest statistics from Eurostat.

A twin national focus on renewable energy and reduced consumption - combined with North Sea oil reserves, have helped to make Denmark the only EU country not reliant on imported energy, according to the latest statistics from Eurostat.

Denmark is the only net exporter of energy in the EU. Its energy independence rate, 58.8 percent, was far ahead of second place Great Britain, which had a 12 percent dependency rating.

In addition to sitting on oil reserves in the North Sea and a countryside dotted with wind turbines, low levels of consumption helped to ensure the nation's energy independence.

Average energy use fell 3.9 percent from 2004 to 2005, to the equivalent of 3.1 tonnes of oil (toe) per capita, slightly below the EU average of 3.6 percent.

A number of southern European and eastern European countries consumed less energy per capita than Denmark, but in a comparison with its northern European neighbours, Denmark had the lowest per capita consumption.

In all, Denmark used 16.9 million toe in 2005. Exports amounted to 10.4 toe, 6.1 percent less than in 2004.

A twin national focus on renewable energy and reduced consumption - combined with North Sea oil reserves, have helped to make Denmark the only EU country not reliant on imported energy, according to the latest statistics from Eurostat.

Denmark is the only net exporter of energy in the EU. Its energy independence rate, 58.8 percent, was far ahead of second place Great Britain, which had a 12 percent dependency rating.

In addition to sitting on oil reserves in the North Sea and a countryside dotted with wind turbines, low levels of consumption helped to ensure the nation's energy independence.

Average energy use fell 3.9 percent from 2004 to 2005, to the equivalent of 3.1 tonnes of oil (toe) per capita, slightly below the EU average of 3.6 percent.

A number of southern European and eastern European countries consumed less energy per capita than Denmark, but in a comparison with its northern European neighbours, Denmark had the lowest per capita consumption.

In all, Denmark used 16.9 million toe in 2005. Exports amounted to 10.4 toe, 6.1 percent less than in 2004.


Source: http://www.cphpost.dk/get/9...

SEP 25 2006
https://www.windaction.org/posts/4808-high-levels-of-energy-production-and-low-consumption-have-helped-to-give-denmark-an-energy-surplus
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