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Wind turbines in Burnley turned down in favour of disabled horse riders

A wind turbine proposed for one of Burnley’s best-known vantage points has been turned down because of the effects it may have on disabled horse riders. Linda Simkiss was also told that the 28.2-metre structure would also spoil the view for a neighbouring property at the windswept location.

A wind turbine proposed for one of Burnley’s best-known vantage points has been turned down because of the effects it may have on disabled horse riders.

Linda Simkiss was also told that the 28.2-metre structure, near Crown Point House, Crown Point Road, would also spoil the view for a neighbouring property at the windswept location.

The outlook for visitors to the nearby Singing Ringing Tree, and golfers, was also more likely to be affected by this turbine than others nearby, according to a planning inspector.

Supporters of the turbine had pointed out it was up to 250 metres away from the nearest neighbouring property.

And, in an appeal lodged with the planning inspectorate, agent Fiona Struthers said it would have a relatively ‘modest and utilitarian’ appearance.

But the plans also attracted objections from Riding for the Disabled, which uses a field at Crown Point to teach young riders with physical and mental conditions, including epilepsy and autism.

Club officials raised concerns about flashes of light from turbine blades ‘spooking’ horses, potentially injuring young riders.

Elizabeth Ord, a planning inspector, accepted that... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

A wind turbine proposed for one of Burnley’s best-known vantage points has been turned down because of the effects it may have on disabled horse riders.

Linda Simkiss was also told that the 28.2-metre structure, near Crown Point House, Crown Point Road, would also spoil the view for a neighbouring property at the windswept location.

The outlook for visitors to the nearby Singing Ringing Tree, and golfers, was also more likely to be affected by this turbine than others nearby, according to a planning inspector.

Supporters of the turbine had pointed out it was up to 250 metres away from the nearest neighbouring property.

And, in an appeal lodged with the planning inspectorate, agent Fiona Struthers said it would have a relatively ‘modest and utilitarian’ appearance.

But the plans also attracted objections from Riding for the Disabled, which uses a field at Crown Point to teach young riders with physical and mental conditions, including epilepsy and autism.

Club officials raised concerns about flashes of light from turbine blades ‘spooking’ horses, potentially injuring young riders.

Elizabeth Ord, a planning inspector, accepted that the turbine was of a ‘sufficiently modest scale’ and could be integrated into the landscape, while generating renewable energy.

But she said that the turbine could also cause ‘substantial harm’ to the outlook for rear windows at the neighbouring property.

She added: “Moreover, should any harm to the disabled riding school and other nearby horse riding activities be added into the equation, this would further tip the balance against the proposal.”


Source: http://www.lancashiretelegr...

JAN 7 2014
https://www.windaction.org/posts/39442-wind-turbines-in-burnley-turned-down-in-favour-of-disabled-horse-riders
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