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Benington wind turbine farmer looks to the sun for energy

The application comes after Mr Bott's six-year battle to bring wind power to Hertfordshire were effectively curtailed in November after a public enquiry dismissed the appeal against East Herts Council's decision.

The farmer behind a controversial wind turbine application has submitted plans to install solar panels at two of his farms.

Andrew Bott wants to build 222 ground mounted photovoltaic panels at White Hall Farm, outside Watton-at-Stone and 218 at Lordship Farm in Benington.

It is estimated the panels would produce about 100,000 kWh of electricity per annum while the farms require 195,000 kWh.

Mr Bott said: "They will be below 2m (6.5 ft) so they sit below the hedgelines, which we can grow if needed.

"Both farms have large industrial units which use a lot of electricity and this goes some way (in generating it)."

Each panel would be 1.64m (5.3 ft) by 0.9m (2.9 ft).

At Lordship Farm, they would be arranged in one array of 109 panels by two panels in height while at White Hall Farm they would be in three banks of 37 panels by two in height.

It is also estimated that the panels would reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 43,000kg.

The application comes after Mr Bott's six-year battle to bring wind power to Hertfordshire were effectively curtailed in November after a public enquiry dismissed the appeal against East Herts... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

The farmer behind a controversial wind turbine application has submitted plans to install solar panels at two of his farms.

Andrew Bott wants to build 222 ground mounted photovoltaic panels at White Hall Farm, outside Watton-at-Stone and 218 at Lordship Farm in Benington.

It is estimated the panels would produce about 100,000 kWh of electricity per annum while the farms require 195,000 kWh.

Mr Bott said: "They will be below 2m (6.5 ft) so they sit below the hedgelines, which we can grow if needed.

"Both farms have large industrial units which use a lot of electricity and this goes some way (in generating it)."

Each panel would be 1.64m (5.3 ft) by 0.9m (2.9 ft).

At Lordship Farm, they would be arranged in one array of 109 panels by two panels in height while at White Hall Farm they would be in three banks of 37 panels by two in height.

It is also estimated that the panels would reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 43,000kg.

The application comes after Mr Bott's six-year battle to bring wind power to Hertfordshire were effectively curtailed in November after a public enquiry dismissed the appeal against East Herts Council's decision.

Mr Bott became formulating his plans in 2007 but the first application to build three 390 ft (119 m) wind turbines was thrown out in 2009.

They would have generated enough electricity for 3,000 homes a year - roughly six per cent of the domestic consumption across East Herts.

An application for a single 284ft (86.5m) turbine was submitted in July 2011 and was recommended by approval by planners at East Herts Council.

But it was rejected by councillors at a meeting of the East Herts Council development control committee in November.

Complaints about ten councillors' conduct over the plan were then dismissed by the council's standards board.

The wind turbine even inspired protest song Beauty Corruption written by the then 16-year-old Benington resident Becky Godlee.

"We tried very hard with wind," Mr Bott said, adding it was the most effective renewable power source for the location.

"I would hope (this application is accepted) but I really don't know."

Peter Kingsnorth, of the Stop Benington Wind Farm group, said: "As far as we are concerned we don't believe of any reason to object to this application.

"The reason is there will be limited visual impact, it shouldn't affect the landscape as with the other applications."


Source: http://www.hertfordshiremer...

APR 30 2013
https://www.windaction.org/posts/37038-benington-wind-turbine-farmer-looks-to-the-sun-for-energy
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