Document

The sound of high winds: the effect of atmospheric stability on wind turbine sound and microphone noise

To conclude, it can be stated that with respect to wind turbine sound an important phenomenon has been overlooked: the change in wind after sunset. This phenomenon will be more important for modern, tall wind turbines and in view of the many wind farms that are planned. If this problem is not recognized and solved it will hamper the expansion of wind energy.

I.6 Research aims

The issues raised above concerning wind turbine noise and its relationship to altitude dependent wind velocity led to the following issues to be investigated:

. what is the influence of atmospheric stability on the speed and sound power of a wind turbine? 

. what is the influence of atmospheric stability on the character of wind turbine sound?

. how widespread is the impact of atmospheric stability on wind turbine performance: is it relevant for new wind turbine projects?; how can noise prediction take this stability into account?

. what can be done to deal with the resultant higher impact of wind turbine sound?

Apart from these directly wind turbine related issues, a final aim was to address a measurement problem:

. how does wind on a microphone affect the measurement of the ambient sound level?

................................................................................................

The sound of a wind turbine or wind farm can thus become more annoying after sunset for two reasons: it becomes louder and the sound exhibits stronger fluctuations. At a given rotor diameter a blade can only be made less noisy with a different design or by slowing down the speed. A decrease in speed however reduces the generated electrical power and must therefore be applied only when necessary. To achieve this a control can be applied that lowers the speed when a noise limit is exceeded, increasing the speed again when the limit allows. This control could work on the generator and/or the pitch angle of the blades.

By changing the pitch angle while the blades rotate, the wind can flow in at an optimal angle at any position on the rotor, by which the energetic efficiency will increase on the one hand and the fluctuation strength of the sound will decrease on the other hand, even rendering the fluctuations inaudible. The total sound power will then decrease even relative to a neutral atmosphere, because the in-flow turbulence sound level will be lower due to the relative absence of atmospheric turbulence. Tilting the rotor to change the pitch angle during rotation does not appear to be a fruitful strategy: the tilt must be so great that the disadvantages will dominate.

The fluctuations near a wind farm can be stronger due to interference from the fluctuations of several turbines. This can be prevented by desynchronizing the turbines, as it happens in daytime by large scale atmospheric turbulence, by adding small and uncorrelated variations in the load of the rotors or the pitch angle of the blades of the individual turbines.

Controlling the sound production thus requires a new strategy for managing wind turbines: in daytime there is often more margin available for sound production than at night and this margin can be used in daytime in exchange for more restrictions at night.

The strength of atmospheric turbulence does not only depend on the(average) wind velocity, but also on the local roughness of the earth surface and the stability of the atmosphere. These last two factors cause friction and thermal turbulence, respectively. The turbulence strength is well known for an unobstructed wind flow over flat land. Turbulence is weaker in a stable and stronger in an unstable atmosphere.

The ‘sound’ pressure level based on atmospheric turbulence appears to agree well with measured and published levels of wind induced pressure levels. Thus the influence of wind on a sound measurement in wind can be calculated. In reverse this calculation model yields a new method to measure the strength of atmospheric turbulence.

To conclude, it can be stated that with respect to wind turbine sound an important phenomenon has been overlooked: the change in wind after sunset. This phenomenon will be more important for modern, tall wind turbines and in view of the many wind farms that are planned. If this problem is not recognized and solved it will hamper the expansion of wind energy.

Title_and_contents_thumb
Title And Contents

Download file (83.8 KB) pdf

Chapter_one_thumb
Chapter One

Download file (544 KB) pdf

Chapter_two_thumb
Chapter Two

Download file (627 KB) pdf

Chapter_three_thumb
Chapter Three

Download file (248 KB) pdf

Chapter_four_thumb
Chapter Four

Download file (1.77 MB) pdf

Chapter_five_thumb
Chapter Five

Download file (225 KB) pdf

Chapter_six_thumb
Chapter Six

Download file (1.6 MB) pdf

Chapter_seven_thumb
Chapter Seven

Download file (496 KB) pdf

Chapter_eight_thumb
Chapter Eight

Download file (394 KB) pdf

Chapter_nine_thumb
Chapter Nine

Download file (96 KB) pdf

Chapter_ten_thumb
Chapter Ten

Download file (90.6 KB) pdf

Acknowledgements_thumb
Acknowledgements

Download file (54.5 KB) pdf

Summary_thumb
Summary

Download file (128 KB) pdf

Samenvatting_thumb
Samenvatting

Download file (115 KB) pdf

References_thumb
References

Download file (366 KB) pdf

Appendices_thumb
Appendices

Download file (215 KB) pdf

Publications_by_the_author_thumb
Publications By The Author

Download file (124 KB) pdf


Source: http://dissertations.ub.rug...

MAY 12 2006
https://www.windaction.org/posts/3208-the-sound-of-high-winds-the-effect-of-atmospheric-stability-on-wind-turbine-sound-and-microphone-noise
back to top