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Doc questioned on turbine evidence

Dr. Robert McCunney, a co-author of the a 2009 review of wind turbine reports for the American and Canadian wind energy associations - which concluded there is no adverse effects on human health due to wind turbine noise - was challenged on whether he still believes this is the case.

There was acrimonious cross-examination of a medical doctor on the final day of testimony at a hearing into the challenge of an approval of a renewable energy project near Thamesville.

Dr. Robert McCunney, a co-author of the a 2009 review of wind turbine reports for the American and Canadian wind energy associations - which concluded there is no adverse effects on human health due to wind turbine noise - was challenged on whether he still believes this is the case.

Eric Gillespie - lawyer for the appellants Katie Erickson and Chatham-Kent Wind Action Inc. in an appeal before the Ontario Environmental Review Tribunal of the Kent Breeze Wind Farm - pointed out 217 other documented cases of people living on three different continents whose quality of life has been impacted by living near wind turbines.

The phrase Wind Turbine Syndrome has been coined by New England resident Dr. Nina Pierpont, who did a study of 38 people suffering adverse health affects from living near wind turbines.

"As a medical doctor, who claims to have an interest in public health, are you telling this tribunal you do not have even a suspicion of harm (to humans caused by wind turbines)?" Gillespie said.

McCunney, who... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

There was acrimonious cross-examination of a medical doctor on the final day of testimony at a hearing into the challenge of an approval of a renewable energy project near Thamesville.

Dr. Robert McCunney, a co-author of the a 2009 review of wind turbine reports for the American and Canadian wind energy associations - which concluded there is no adverse effects on human health due to wind turbine noise - was challenged on whether he still believes this is the case.

Eric Gillespie - lawyer for the appellants Katie Erickson and Chatham-Kent Wind Action Inc. in an appeal before the Ontario Environmental Review Tribunal of the Kent Breeze Wind Farm - pointed out 217 other documented cases of people living on three different continents whose quality of life has been impacted by living near wind turbines.

The phrase Wind Turbine Syndrome has been coined by New England resident Dr. Nina Pierpont, who did a study of 38 people suffering adverse health affects from living near wind turbines.

"As a medical doctor, who claims to have an interest in public health, are you telling this tribunal you do not have even a suspicion of harm (to humans caused by wind turbines)?" Gillespie said.

McCunney, who pointed out the study titled: "Wind Turbine Sound and Health Effects An Expert Panel Review," focused primarily on peer-reviewed published reports.

"I would suggest all these authors submit their reports to get peer-reviewed and get them published," he said.

Gillespie pointed to a section of the expert panel review report that notes when there is suspicion of harm, case-control studies help determine a common cause.

McCunney asked if the studies on people suffering impacts from living near wind turbines were published in a peer-reviewed publication.

Gillespie said they were not, and asked if case-control studies should be ignored if they are not peer-reviewed.

McCunney said it has been a "time-honoured" process in the medical and scientific fields that studies undergo a peer review to confirm the quality of the research and conclusions.

He questioned the quality of these studies since they were still not peer-reviewed three or four years after being written.

Gillespie pointed to a critique of the expert panel review on the National Health Service website in the United Kingdom, which is the largest health service website in the world.

He noted one criticism was the fact an epidemiologist wasn't included on the panel of experts.

McCunney said he's heard that comment. Although he is not an epidemiologist, the doctor said his credentials in the field, including his education, along with serving as an adviser, reviewer and teacher, qualifies him to make epidemiological assessments.

The appellants are challenging the renewal energy project, primarily owned by Suncor Energy, on the basis the noise will cause harm to residents living nearby, including sleeplessness, headaches, inner-ear problems and stress.

The Kent Breeze Wind Farm, which is still under construction near Thamesville, is the first renewable energy project to be approved under Ontario's Green Energy Act.

Dates to hear the final submissions were tentatively scheduled for next Wednesday and Thursday, but are expected to be rescheduled until sometime in May. The final submissions will also likely be heard in Toronto.


Source: http://www.chathamdailynews...

MAR 31 2011
https://www.windaction.org/posts/30476-doc-questioned-on-turbine-evidence
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