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Turbine opposition heats up in Amaranth

A group calling itself the Amaranth Citizens Coalition (ACC) has called a public meeting for June 20, and the group's spokesman at township council Wednesday left no doubt that its aim would be to fight rezoning for wind turbines every step of the way.

Ian Reed, a "semiretired farmer" and supporter of "airport" designations for all grass airstrips in the township, delved into every aspect of wind farms, from turbulence to net income to landowners, in a presentation that lasted a bit more than an hour.

He said his research was accurate - "I'm presenting scientific information" - while accusing supporters of the turbines of "citing data they don't know anything about."

The airport versus airstrip definition for private airfields is important with respect to the township's Official Plan, and Wednesday wasn't the first time Mr. Reed had raised the issue. The OP requires a 10-km setback from airports, but not from "airstrips."

Although Mr. Reed insisted that the township should retain the definition as well as the 10-km requirement, he appeared to be somewhat flexible on that issue, if not on others.

"If [Canadian Hydro Developers] would have worked with [the aviators] we might have come up with something."

He didn't indicate what might be acceptable, but did say that Canadian Hydro was not suggesting what he sees as realistic setbacks. According to Mr. Reed, wind farms increase the wind velocity aloft, thereby creating more turbulence. "Turbulence... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

Ian Reed, a "semiretired farmer" and supporter of "airport" designations for all grass airstrips in the township, delved into every aspect of wind farms, from turbulence to net income to landowners, in a presentation that lasted a bit more than an hour.
 
He said his research was accurate - "I'm presenting scientific information" - while accusing supporters of the turbines of "citing data they don't know anything about."
 
The airport versus airstrip definition for private airfields is important with respect to the township's Official Plan, and Wednesday wasn't the first time Mr. Reed had raised the issue. The OP requires a 10-km setback from airports, but not from "airstrips."
 
Although Mr. Reed insisted that the township should retain the definition as well as the 10-km requirement, he appeared to be somewhat flexible on that issue, if not on others.
 
"If [Canadian Hydro Developers] would have worked with [the aviators] we might have come up with something."
 
He didn't indicate what might be acceptable, but did say that Canadian Hydro was not suggesting what he sees as realistic setbacks. According to Mr. Reed, wind farms increase the wind velocity aloft, thereby creating more turbulence. "Turbulence close to the ground is dangerous to small aircraft." He said Canadian Hydro wasn't accounting adequately for that.
 
On the other hand, as representative of ACC, he read from various literature about the preservation of rural lifestyles and the beauty of the township. Flashing a variety of scenic publications, he said there wasn't a wind turbine in any of them.
 
With respect to landowners,Mr. Reed estimated that some would sustain a net loss after all taxes were accounted for. He based his estimates on a gross income of between $5,500 and $7,500 per turbine, but said there'd be 30 per cent income tax on that, along with a $2,700 property tax bill.
 
However, Deputy Mayor Don MacIver said - and clerk-treasurer Sue Stone confirmed -that Canadian Hydro pays the property tax amount to the landowner, although the landowner is responsible for paying it to the township. Hence, the landowner would receive the equivalent of property tax money in addition to the turbine income from Canadian Hydro.
 
Township council is awaiting a peer review of an Environmental Screening Report, in which many of the issues raised by Mr. Reed are likely to be detailed from a current technological perspective.
 
In the meantime, Mr. Reed appears to have garnered support from at least Councillor Percy Way, who questioned how much energy Ontario is exporting, and then said: "I want energy for my municipality and not for the U.S.A."
 
The ACC meeting is at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, June 20, in the basement of the township building at Laurel.
 
It will feature two guest speakers: Frank Entwisle of Windwatch Conservation, and Tim Cane of Jones Consulting in Barrie.
 
Jones Consulting appears on Google as generally a land-use consultant, but "Windwatch Conservation" does not seem to have a website.
 
 


Source: http://www.citizen.on.ca/n...

JUN 9 2006
https://www.windaction.org/posts/2986-turbine-opposition-heats-up-in-amaranth
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