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Bylaws needed to install residential wind turbines

The problem is with the proposed bylaws that she says are “too restrictive” and make it so that “95 per cent of the people” can’t even install one on their property.

The installation of a new energy source that would reduce one local home owner’s hydro bill is on hold until a new bylaw is in place for residential wind turbine.

“It’s a waiting game now,” said Margaret Eby of Wheatley.

She hopes the waiting doesn’t go on for too long.

Because when another winter season hits she will have to pay another $3,500 in hydro bills -- while the equipment that would save her from paying that price sits in her driveway.

That equipment, worth about $30,000, is a new residential wind turbine and tower that would provide enough power for her whole house and then some from the wind generated off Lake Erie.

“It would pay for itself in a couple of years,” she said.

“We actually re-mortgaged our house to take care of ourselves,” she said with the concerns of raising energy costs. “It is the best way to go economically and environmentally.”

“This (on the lake) is the windiest place in Ontario,” she commented, and the turbine would produce enough power to completely power her house and more.

The problem is with the proposed bylaws that she says are “too restrictive” and make it so that “95 per cent of the people” can’t even install one on their property.

The provincial... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  
The installation of a new energy source that would reduce one local home owner’s hydro bill is on hold until a new bylaw is in place for residential wind turbine.

“It’s a waiting game now,” said Margaret Eby of Wheatley.

She hopes the waiting doesn’t go on for too long.

Because when another winter season hits she will have to pay another $3,500 in hydro bills -- while the equipment that would save her from paying that price sits in her driveway.

That equipment, worth about $30,000, is a new residential wind turbine and tower that would provide enough power for her whole house and then some from the wind generated off Lake Erie.

“It would pay for itself in a couple of years,” she said.

“We actually re-mortgaged our house to take care of ourselves,” she said with the concerns of raising energy costs. “It is the best way to go economically and environmentally.”

“This (on the lake) is the windiest place in Ontario,” she commented, and the turbine would produce enough power to completely power her house and more.

The problem is with the proposed bylaws that she says are “too restrictive” and make it so that “95 per cent of the people” can’t even install one on their property.

The provincial government is promoting alternative energy sources and Tom Greenside, owner of Renewable Energy Solutions out of Tecumseh, is finding it more difficult at the municipal level.

“There are no bylaws in place for wind turbines -- they are being drafted now by each municipality. There wasn’t a lot people doing this before,” explained Greenside in a telephone interview on May 22.

Eby says that the turbine that she bought through Greenside measures 80 feet. That is larger than what is currently being proposed for the bylaws.

Greenside said that with the turbine and tower Eby needs to place it 90 feet in the air to get into the “laminar flow.”

“Down below that area -- she is wasting her money,” he said.

“The rated output would be 3.5 kilowatts per hour based on 10 meters per second and 22 miles per hour wind,” said Greenside. “Where she is located she should produce 86 k per day.”

Which would be almost three times that of what the average residential home uses of about 800 k per month.

Another problem for Eby with the proposed new bylaw is in property requirements.

Her lake-front home sits on 150 feet of water-front property and is 60 feet deep.

But proposed lot requirements are for a “110 per cent fall zone” and the 80 foot tower wouldn’t fit on her lot.

“The bylaws, as they are or as they are being proposed, worry about lot size...if a tower goes down you don’t want it to fall on an occupied dwelling,” she explained.

“There has only been like one tower in the whole history of wind turbines that has fallen over,” she stated.

“These things are not meant to fall, they are engineered to stay up in the air,” commented Greenside.

Eby does have her neighbors’ approval to put the tower and turbine up and says that she could place the tower so that it wouldn’t hit any occupied dwelling.

Renewable Energy Solutions will buy the equipment back if Eby is unable to use it due to the restriction.

“I’m going through this (establishing bylaws for residential wind turbines) with all the municipalities. They should try to make it the same playing field all the way across,” he said.

Eby says if she can’t install the wind turbine she would then look at installing a solar system that would be four times the cost up front.

“It just doesn’t make any sense,” she said. “With all this available wind.”
“Can you feel that wind?” she asked motioning at the lake.

And that day you definitely could feel the wind (a chilly wind that could leave a wind burn on your face) coming off Lake Erie.

Councillor Bryon Fluker said the municipality is in a real “bind” as they are still waiting on the province to approve its official plan and until that happens they can not bring these bylaws up to date.

“I would like to see us hold some public meetings soon,” he said of the wind turbine issue.

He said he is aware of three residents who have know expressed an interest in residential wind turbines.

Leamington is now addressing the issue of residential wind turbines too. And according to Doug Morrish, director of development services for the municipality, it was just recently brought up at a meeting.

“Right now, wind turbines are not identified in our plan - so they are actually prohibited of use,” he said. “We are now review our zoning bylaw - this is going to take some time.”

He said someone looking to install a wind turbine can apply to council for a zoning amendment.

"We're making some suggestions to council for their approval in the zoning bylaw process,” he said.

There has been one inquiry so far on residential wind turbines that he knows of, he said.

“The municipality is looking at permitting them (wind turbines) with some regulations...hopefully by this fall.”


 


Source: http://www.leamingtonpostan...

JUN 1 2006
https://www.windaction.org/posts/2877-bylaws-needed-to-install-residential-wind-turbines
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