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Green energy or dollars?

Estimates for developing the Sheffield and Sutton project exceed $100 million. Up to two thirds of that is offset by federal subsidies, which we pay for. Over $60 million. A pretty good motivator.

Mr. Nat Tripp appears to have hit a "hot button" for Washington Electric Coop and their general manager Avram Patt. WEC has been a supporter of industrial scale wind in the Northeast Kingdom for some time.

But what about industrial wind in Washington County?

Buried in his letter to the editor, Patt notes: "WEC has successfully resold Renewable Energy Certificates ... and is very knowledgeable about this subject." We agree with this statement.

Avram was a presenter at the Sutton informational meetings. When asked if the power could be resold to the grid, he skirted around the subject but eventually conceded that power "could be resold." When asked why there were no industrial wind projects for Washington County or northwestern Vermont he said that there just wasn't enough wind or that the wind just "wasn't right."

Mr. Tripp simply stated a basic observation: By passing green credits on to fossil fuel-burning companies we are, in effect, allowing these companies to boost production.

Boosting output of green house gasses, anywhere in our region, directly effects Vermont's environment. Plain and simple.

Estimates for developing the Sheffield and Sutton project exceed $100 million.

Up to two thirds... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

Mr. Nat Tripp appears to have hit a "hot button" for Washington Electric Coop and their general manager Avram Patt. WEC has been a supporter of industrial scale wind in the Northeast Kingdom for some time.
 
But what about industrial wind in Washington County?
 
Buried in his letter to the editor, Patt notes: "WEC has successfully resold Renewable Energy Certificates ... and is very knowledgeable about this subject." We agree with this statement.
 
Avram was a presenter at the Sutton informational meetings. When asked if the power could be resold to the grid, he skirted around the subject but eventually conceded that power "could be resold." When asked why there were no industrial wind projects for Washington County or northwestern Vermont he said that there just wasn't enough wind or that the wind just "wasn't right."
 
Mr. Tripp simply stated a basic observation: By passing green credits on to fossil fuel-burning companies we are, in effect, allowing these companies to boost production.
 
Boosting output of green house gasses, anywhere in our region, directly effects Vermont's environment. Plain and simple.
 
Estimates for developing the Sheffield and Sutton project exceed $100 million.
 
Up to two thirds of that is offset by federal subsidies, which we pay for. Over $60 million. A pretty good motivator.
 
As the average Vermonter sorts through information about this latest energy fad, he or she will find that industrial wind has been in development for years. A great deal of "quiet planning" has transpired from the Northwest that most of us in the Kingdom knew nothing about.
 
What would motivate WEC to advocate so strongly for one renewable energy source? Were they so concerned about the environment that they felt compelled to act?
 
Is industrial wind the best renewable or is it the only renewable for Vermont? Why did WEC award nearly $1 million to industrial wind developers for Northeast Kingdom projects?
 
As one Sutton resident asked ... are they motivated by "green" as in energy or "green" as in dollars?


Source: http://www.caledonianrecord...

MAY 24 2006
https://www.windaction.org/posts/2796-green-energy-or-dollars
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