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Wind turbine takes lightning hit

One of Verve Energy’s wind turbines at the Esperance Wind Farm was hit by lightning last Saturday week, shredding the blade and making the turbine inoperative. Technicians were at the site last Friday doing routine maintenance on other turbines and say that the damaged turbine has been made safe for the time being.

One of Verve Energy’s wind turbines at the Esperance Wind Farm was hit by lightning last Saturday week, shredding the blade and making the turbine inoperative.

Technicians were at the site last Friday doing routine maintenance on other turbines and say that the damaged turbine has been made safe for the time being.

“We’ve been up there and cut away what debris we could and there isn’t any danger,” Verve contractor, Brian Helenius from Power Technics said.

“The blades have to come from Denmark in Europe and then they have to be finely balanced with one another, so there is a lot of work involved in replacing it.

“Each blade has a serial number and a weighting so when the three are installed together, they have to be finely tuned.”

He explained that if the blades get to a certain excessive wind speed, or a fault is detected in the equipment, they automatically shut down.

“They all have their own safety features, a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), which controls each turbine.”

Mr Helenius also explained that when the wind farm at Esperance was opened in 1994 the technology available meant that energy produced by each turbine was 225... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

One of Verve Energy’s wind turbines at the Esperance Wind Farm was hit by lightning last Saturday week, shredding the blade and making the turbine inoperative.

Technicians were at the site last Friday doing routine maintenance on other turbines and say that the damaged turbine has been made safe for the time being.

“We’ve been up there and cut away what debris we could and there isn’t any danger,” Verve contractor, Brian Helenius from Power Technics said.

“The blades have to come from Denmark in Europe and then they have to be finely balanced with one another, so there is a lot of work involved in replacing it.

“Each blade has a serial number and a weighting so when the three are installed together, they have to be finely tuned.”

He explained that if the blades get to a certain excessive wind speed, or a fault is detected in the equipment, they automatically shut down.

“They all have their own safety features, a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), which controls each turbine.”

Mr Helenius also explained that when the wind farm at Esperance was opened in 1994 the technology available meant that energy produced by each turbine was 225 Kilowatts.

“The newer turbines here at Esperance are 600 Kilowatts and the turbines at Albany produce 1,200 kilowatts.

“To give you some idea of what that means, a normal bar heater uses one kilowatt.”

“Turbines now are producing five megawatt.”


Source: http://www.esperanceexpress...

JUN 2 2010
https://www.windaction.org/posts/26580-wind-turbine-takes-lightning-hit
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