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Residents reject wind turbine finding

An official declaration from Ontario's chief medical officer of health that living next to wind turbines is not dangerous to your health has been rejected by at least a couple of residents in the southwest corner of Norfolk. "If you don't look for something, you're not going to find it," Stephana Johnston said, referring to Dr. Arlene King's report released Thursday.

An official declaration from Ontario's chief medical officer of health that living next to wind turbines is not dangerous to your health has been rejected by at least a couple of residents in the southwest corner of Norfolk.

"If you don't look for something, you're not going to find it," Stephana Johnston said, referring to Dr. Arlene King's report released Thursday. "There's nothing in the report that indicated she looked for anything. She did a review of the literature."

Johnston, whose home west of Port Rowan is surrounded by 18 turbines, said she will appear before council Tuesday and ask them to join 58 other Ontario municipalities in calling for a moratorium on the building any new turbines.

An outspoken critic of the turbines, Johnston has sought medical treatment for "a stuffed feeling" in her ears and "a buzzing in my brain."

The 79-year-old retired school teacher now rents a room in Delhi where she goes to on occasion to sleep. She blames the turbines for her health problems.

"When I leave my home, everything improves," said Johnston, a former federal candidate for the Green Party in Haldimand-Norfolk.

Close to 700 windmills have gone up... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

An official declaration from Ontario's chief medical officer of health that living next to wind turbines is not dangerous to your health has been rejected by at least a couple of residents in the southwest corner of Norfolk.

"If you don't look for something, you're not going to find it," Stephana Johnston said, referring to Dr. Arlene King's report released Thursday. "There's nothing in the report that indicated she looked for anything. She did a review of the literature."

Johnston, whose home west of Port Rowan is surrounded by 18 turbines, said she will appear before council Tuesday and ask them to join 58 other Ontario municipalities in calling for a moratorium on the building any new turbines.

An outspoken critic of the turbines, Johnston has sought medical treatment for "a stuffed feeling" in her ears and "a buzzing in my brain."

The 79-year-old retired school teacher now rents a room in Delhi where she goes to on occasion to sleep. She blames the turbines for her health problems.

"When I leave my home, everything improves," said Johnston, a former federal candidate for the Green Party in Haldimand-Norfolk.

Close to 700 windmills have gone up across the province in recent years as Queen's Park embraces green energy efforts.

At the same time, a movement has started worldwide against them. Some experts warn long-term exposure to low-frequency vibrations from the swirling blades is causing a variety of problems for neighbours: sleeplessness, headaches, dizziness.

King's report, however, pours cold water on those theories.

"According to the scientific evidence, there isn't any direct casual link between wind turbine noise and adverse health effects," King said in a media release.

"The sound level from wind turbines at common residential setbacks is not sufficient to cause hearing impairment or other direct adverse health effects, but it may annoy some people," the release added.

Johnston, however, said King's study should have included talking to people living next to turbines.


Source: http://www.stcatharinesstan...

MAY 25 2010
https://www.windaction.org/posts/26476-residents-reject-wind-turbine-finding
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