Article

Winds of change stir up Amaranth

Amaranth resident Ian Reed, who made a plea against wind turbines at the township council last week, says he's obtaining letters from persons on the 10th Line who claim not to have received notices of the change to concrete poles after the council had approved wooden ones for the transmission line.

And, in the meantime, the council has taken the Environmental Screening Report on the second phase of the Melancthon Wind Project "to the next level" by asking for an extension of the deadline for filing objections.

Mr. Reed, who describes himself variously as a retired farmer, a hobby farmer and a private pilot, is opposing the turbines on several bases.

First, he says they are of limited value in the broader view of energy generation.

He fears their presence destroys the landscape, and depreciates property values.

Running counter to his position, a U.S. Government sponsored study "found no empirical evidence" that property values declined within the "viewscape," but that, in fact, the opposite was true.

Whichever the case, Mr. Reid says he simply does not want to look at the structures for the next 20 years or more. He was to have held a meeting of residents at his home Wednesday night.

The 10th Line poles became an item of controversy at the council meeting when he spoke for 90 minutes in opposition to turbines last week.

At that meeting, Councillor Jane Aultman said Canadian Hydro Developers asked to change to concrete from wood following the Hurricane Katrina disaster. She said the council... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  
And, in the meantime, the council has taken the Environmental Screening Report on the second phase of the Melancthon Wind Project "to the next level" by asking for an extension of the deadline for filing objections.
 
Mr. Reed, who describes himself variously as a retired farmer, a hobby farmer and a private pilot, is opposing the turbines on several bases.
 
First, he says they are of limited value in the broader view of energy generation.
 
He fears their presence destroys the landscape, and depreciates property values.
 
Running counter to his position, a U.S. Government sponsored study "found no empirical evidence" that property values declined within the "viewscape," but that, in fact, the opposite was true.
 
Whichever the case, Mr. Reid says he simply does not want to look at the structures for the next 20 years or more. He was to have held a meeting of residents at his home Wednesday night.
 
The 10th Line poles became an item of controversy at the council meeting when he spoke for 90 minutes in opposition to turbines last week.
 
At that meeting, Councillor Jane Aultman said Canadian Hydro Developers asked to change to concrete from wood following the Hurricane Katrina disaster. She said the council approved the change conditional upon residential agreement for it.
 
"If a single resident had [voiced opposition], it would have been brought back before council." She said all persons were notified in some fashion, and no one responded.
 
Mr. Reed took issue with that, saying there was at least one person in the gallery who would say he hadn't been notified.
 
In other opposition, he argues that the township's assessment growth should be from residential development, not wind generation.
 
"Growth is people, not wind generators."
 
In a phone interview Tuesday, he wasn't prepared to reconcile that with provincial guidelines on foodland, but said a few homes at the corners of farms wouldn't interfere with farming. "They work around the corners anyway."
 
In the meantime, the provincial government appears fully in support of wind generation.
 
In a letter to Amaranth council, Energy Minister Donna Cansfield said: "As you are aware, the Province of Ontario has an urgent need for electrical generation."
 
She said she hoped council would keep that in mind when making a decision on rezoning to permit the project.
 
Some members of council took exception to the tone of the letter, and Mr. Reed said he has written to her, presumably to object.
 
The deadline for responses to the ESR has expired, but Amaranth has asked for an extension on the basis that it hadn't received responses to a number of issues from Canadian Hydro.
 
It wasn't clear whether or not the request could lead to an upgrading of the environmental study to an Environmental Assessment from the "screening" process.
 




Source: http://www.citizen.on.ca/ne...

MAY 11 2006
https://www.windaction.org/posts/2574-winds-of-change-stir-up-amaranth
back to top