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Fairhaven wind project in the works again

Fairhaven's commercial wind project, stalled in 2008, is moving forward again, this time as a municipal project, a town official said. "There's a plan to install two commercial wind turbines at the wastewater treatment facility site on Arsene Street in what will now be a municipal project," Selectman Brian Bowcock said. The new proposal is very similar to the previous one, using the same location and siting of the turbines and working with the same private company, Plymouth-based CCI Energy.

FAIRHAVEN - Fairhaven's commercial wind project, stalled in 2008, is moving forward again, this time as a municipal project, a town official said.

"There's a plan to install two commercial wind turbines at the wastewater treatment facility site on Arsene Street in what will now be a municipal project," Selectman Brian Bowcock said.

The new proposal is very similar to the previous one, using the same location and siting of the turbines and working with the same private company, Plymouth-based CCI Energy. This time, however, Fairhaven hopes to use more than 50 percent of the energy produced by the turbines to power multiple buildings, giving the project a municipal scope.

As a municipal project, it does not need a special permit from the town, Bowcock said.

CCI's original wind plan, a private commercial venture, received a special permit from the Planning Board in May 2008. The permit was relinquished to avoid a legal challenge from residents. At the time, revenue estimates and projected energy savings for the town were expected to be about $150,000 annually.

CCI President James Sweeney said new regulations under the state's Green Communities Act make the current plan even... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

FAIRHAVEN - Fairhaven's commercial wind project, stalled in 2008, is moving forward again, this time as a municipal project, a town official said.

"There's a plan to install two commercial wind turbines at the wastewater treatment facility site on Arsene Street in what will now be a municipal project," Selectman Brian Bowcock said.

The new proposal is very similar to the previous one, using the same location and siting of the turbines and working with the same private company, Plymouth-based CCI Energy. This time, however, Fairhaven hopes to use more than 50 percent of the energy produced by the turbines to power multiple buildings, giving the project a municipal scope.

As a municipal project, it does not need a special permit from the town, Bowcock said.

CCI's original wind plan, a private commercial venture, received a special permit from the Planning Board in May 2008. The permit was relinquished to avoid a legal challenge from residents. At the time, revenue estimates and projected energy savings for the town were expected to be about $150,000 annually.

CCI President James Sweeney said new regulations under the state's Green Communities Act make the current plan even more financially attractive to the town.

"The potential revenue dramatically increases because of the net metering possibilities that the town would have," he said.

Changes to how net metering occurs will allow Fairhaven to use the energy at all town-owned buildings, including schools and the police station, Sweeney said.

"Net metering power goes to the grid and then the grid transports it for a very low cost to all the buildings owned by the town of Fairhaven," Sweeney said. "In the past, we would have had to wire the different locations up and it was too costly.

"If we didn't have this, the power would only go to the wastewater treatment facility."

According to Sweeney, the approximately $9 million project will use two 1.65 mega-watt turbines that look almost identical to the two Vestas that CCI had planned to use originally. But the new turbines, standing about 460 feet high including blade height, will produce more energy from the same amount of wind, he said.

If all goes well, Sweeney said he expects to begin engineering drawings for the foundations and electrical wiring by the end of February and likely apply for building permits some time this summer. Only after permits are in hand can an order be placed for the turbines, he said, noting that there now is a five-month minimum wait for turbines.

Contract and other details are under discussion but the town has double-checked the legalities of the proposal with the state, Bowcock said, and is comfortable with the response it received.

"The town went to the (state) inspector general to make sure we are following every legal avenue correctly," he said.


Source: http://www.southcoasttoday....

FEB 1 2010
https://www.windaction.org/posts/24403-fairhaven-wind-project-in-the-works-again
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