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Battle continues over wind turbines

The City of Grand Rapids wants to install two turbines to generate 80,000 megawatts to power the city's water treatment plant. The city brought their plans to the residents of Grand Haven on Monday night, and they are not too happy about it. The Lake Michigan shoreline has been described as beautiful and pristine, and for many people in Grand Haven, it's also their backyard.

The fight continues over proposed wind turbines near Grand Haven.

The City of Grand Rapids wants to install two turbines to generate 80,000 megawatts to power the city's water treatment plant. The city brought their plans to the residents of Grand Haven on Monday night, and they are not too happy about it.

The Lake Michigan shoreline has been described as beautiful and pristine, and for many people in Grand Haven, it's also their backyard.

"I have concerns on the safety of these turbines and I have concerns about property values," said Mary Sportel.

The turbines would be located on 79 acres at the water filtration plant which is used to pump 40 million gallons of water daily from Lake Michigan to Grand Rapids. 240 homes sit within a mile of where the turbines would be. The proposed turbines would stand 414 feet tall from the base of the tower to the tip of the blades. The township already has an ordinance in place that bans turbines taller than 150 feet.

The main concerns for residents are the effect that the turbines would have on tourism, property value, and health effects caused by low frequency sound waves, and the shadows cast by the turbines.

"There are all these questions out... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

The fight continues over proposed wind turbines near Grand Haven.

The City of Grand Rapids wants to install two turbines to generate 80,000 megawatts to power the city's water treatment plant. The city brought their plans to the residents of Grand Haven on Monday night, and they are not too happy about it.

The Lake Michigan shoreline has been described as beautiful and pristine, and for many people in Grand Haven, it's also their backyard.

"I have concerns on the safety of these turbines and I have concerns about property values," said Mary Sportel.

The turbines would be located on 79 acres at the water filtration plant which is used to pump 40 million gallons of water daily from Lake Michigan to Grand Rapids. 240 homes sit within a mile of where the turbines would be. The proposed turbines would stand 414 feet tall from the base of the tower to the tip of the blades. The township already has an ordinance in place that bans turbines taller than 150 feet.

The main concerns for residents are the effect that the turbines would have on tourism, property value, and health effects caused by low frequency sound waves, and the shadows cast by the turbines.

"There are all these questions out there, studies haven't been done so people have big concerns and rightfully so, but a lot of people it's like they don't want it in their backyard," said Jan O'Connell of the Michigan Sierra Club.

According to Grand Rapids, no existing houses are within 1,500 feet of where there turbines would be, but for some that's not enough.

"We have a beautiful site there with a nature preserve and we have two bald eagles back there now," said Sportel.

Representatives for Grand Rapids admit that many feasibility studies still have to be done, and say that Monday night's meeting was just to get feedback. While most of the feedback on Monday night was overwhelmingly negative, those in favor of the turbines still have hope.

"No one was in support of coal-fired power plants," said O'Connell, "but if we don't make this change to wind turbines that's exactly what we'll have for the next 50 years."


Source: http://www.wwmt.com/article...

DEC 1 2009
https://www.windaction.org/posts/23385-battle-continues-over-wind-turbines
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