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Council tries to slow turbines

Arran-Elderslie is likely to impose a one-year moratorium, with a possible one-year extension, on construction of large wind turbines. Council is expected to pass an interim control bylaw Oct. 26 despite being told by the provincial government such bylaws are not allowed. "There are a lot of people with some real concerns about these turbines," Elderslie ward Coun. Mark Davis told council.

Arran-Elderslie is likely to impose a one-year moratorium, with a possible one-year extension, on construction of large wind turbines.

Council is expected to pass an interim control bylaw Oct. 26 despite being told by the provincial government such bylaws are not allowed.

"There are a lot of people with some real concerns about these turbines," Elderslie ward Coun. Mark Davis told council.

"I don't have a problem sidestepping Dalton (Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty) and taking our own action," Davis said. He added a moratorium "needs to be put in place until a study is done on the health effects of these turbines.

"Once the turbines are here, they are here . . . let's not make the biggest mistake to ever hit rural Ontario by allowing these things in our municipality," he said.

Davis maintains there's "indisputable evidence that industrial wind turbines are having a very negative effect on the health and well-being of a number of people living around existing wind farms in Ontario."

He's long been critical of government regulations, including "the thousands of dollars we spend every year protecting frogs and fish while doing construction projects to satisfy the imposed requirements of... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

Arran-Elderslie is likely to impose a one-year moratorium, with a possible one-year extension, on construction of large wind turbines.

Council is expected to pass an interim control bylaw Oct. 26 despite being told by the provincial government such bylaws are not allowed.

"There are a lot of people with some real concerns about these turbines," Elderslie ward Coun. Mark Davis told council.

"I don't have a problem sidestepping Dalton (Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty) and taking our own action," Davis said. He added a moratorium "needs to be put in place until a study is done on the health effects of these turbines.

"Once the turbines are here, they are here . . . let's not make the biggest mistake to ever hit rural Ontario by allowing these things in our municipality," he said.

Davis maintains there's "indisputable evidence that industrial wind turbines are having a very negative effect on the health and well-being of a number of people living around existing wind farms in Ontario."

He's long been critical of government regulations, including "the thousands of dollars we spend every year protecting frogs and fish while doing construction projects to satisfy the imposed requirements of our upper tier governments" and says the protection of people and domesticated animals should be of equal or greater importance. However, Davis points out, the provincial government has removed the normal planning process from municipal governments in regards to industrial wind turbines "that would or could offer these very protections."

Other members of council agreed with Davis' concerns about wind turbines, but Deputy-mayor Mary Cumming questioned if so strongly opposing the province on the issue would affect future grant money to the municipality.

"I know one should not reflect the other, but I sometimes think it does," Cumming said. "It makes you wonder why Arran-Elderslie never seems to get the grant money other municipalities do."

"It's pretty pathetic to think that by standing up for one issue it blackballs you for future funding," Davis responded. "I guess we need to accept that possibility."

Arran-Elderslie, Davis noted, imposed a moratorium a few years ago when the construction of large hog barns was a concern in the municipality.

"We did it in order to give us time to address the concerns . . . the concerns, especially the health-related ones, with wind turbines are far greater. I would rather say to a ratepayer we failed to get anywhere than to tell them we never tried," Davis said.

Davis is also asking the municipality to send letters to municipal governments in Grey and Bruce counties, as well as the rest of rural Ontario, "asking those municipalities to do likewise. We must put a stop to these things. They will change life in rural Ontario forever if we don't."


Source: http://www.owensoundsuntime...

OCT 20 2009
https://www.windaction.org/posts/22741-council-tries-to-slow-turbines
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