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New wind turbine rules announced

Standardized setbacks, domestic manufacturing content and a reworked approval process are among the province’s new wind turbine regulations. As part of the Green Energy Act, there will also be a feed-in tariff program, which allows everyone from homeowners to large developers to sell power to the grid. ... This distance would increase with the number of turbines and sound level ratings. The province also integrated various approvals — including environmental and municipal — into the Renewable Energy Approval process.

Standardized setbacks, domestic manufacturing content and a reworked approval process are among the province’s new wind turbine regulations.

As part of the Green Energy Act, there will also be a feed-in tariff program, which allows everyone from homeowners to large developers to sell power to the grid.

In a voicemail message, Chatham-Kent Essex MPP Pat Hoy said the new legislation is good news for the province and the municipality.

“I think it’s important that we go with green energy here in Ontario,” he said. “We’ve really progressed since 2003, when there were only 10 turbines in all of Ontario.

“We’ve now moved to where there are 670.”

Hoy said there will be 975 turbines in the province by 2012.

“It’s a quick way of getting energy compared to other sources,” he said.

A provincewide 550-metre setback is now the minimum distance from residences for one to five turbines.

This distance would increase with the number of turbines and sound level ratings.

The province also integrated various approvals — including environmental and municipal — into the Renewable Energy Approval process.

Developers will be required to have Ontario goods and labour make up a certain percentage of their... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

Standardized setbacks, domestic manufacturing content and a reworked approval process are among the province’s new wind turbine regulations.

As part of the Green Energy Act, there will also be a feed-in tariff program, which allows everyone from homeowners to large developers to sell power to the grid.

In a voicemail message, Chatham-Kent Essex MPP Pat Hoy said the new legislation is good news for the province and the municipality.

“I think it’s important that we go with green energy here in Ontario,” he said. “We’ve really progressed since 2003, when there were only 10 turbines in all of Ontario.

“We’ve now moved to where there are 670.”

Hoy said there will be 975 turbines in the province by 2012.

“It’s a quick way of getting energy compared to other sources,” he said.

A provincewide 550-metre setback is now the minimum distance from residences for one to five turbines.

This distance would increase with the number of turbines and sound level ratings.

The province also integrated various approvals — including environmental and municipal — into the Renewable Energy Approval process.

Developers will be required to have Ontario goods and labour make up a certain percentage of their costs. For wind, this will be 25 per cent, increasing to 50 per cent in 2012.

In addition to wind, the Act covers other green power sources, such as solar.

The province stated it will provide financial assistance for infrastructure costs through municipal and community energy partnerships.

South Kent Coun. Art Stirling represents a ward with a number of additional wind projects proposed.

He said yesterday he has mixed emotions about the legislation.

“It would appear that there’s a lot of positive things in the regulations,” Stirling said. “It gives us all a chance to participate economically in the process.”

He believes the feed-in tariff and the domestic manufacturing requirements will be beneficial, and that turbines and leaseholders will help the local economy.

However, Stirling said he’s concerned about the new approval process.

“The underlying worry that I have is that individual citizens and their municipal governments are not going to have as big an opportunity to influence the extent by which the green energy industry develops in their community,” he said.

Stirling said from what he understands municipalities will still be able to provide some input.

“I know municipalities will be consulted,” he said.

Wind Concerns Ontario slammed the new regulations, calling them a “betrayal to all the people of rural Ontario.”

In a statement, the organization said the setbacks didn’t go far enough to reduce the risk of health effects from turbines.

“Independent health studies of real patients must be conducted,” the statement read. “A promised research chair to examine negative health effects exposed by Wind Concerns Ontario and others has not materialized.”


Source: http://www.chathamdailynews...

SEP 24 2009
https://www.windaction.org/posts/22346-new-wind-turbine-rules-announced
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