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Officials streamline wind turbine policy; Demand for privately owned towers prompted law

The Town of Coxsackie took steps to promote alternative energy Monday night at a public hearing, approving the Small Wind Energy Facility Law after a lightly attended public comment session with no dissent. Town Board members with community input had been working on the ordinance since last October, finally hammering out the finished draft on June 8.

COXSACKIE - The Town of Coxsackie took steps to promote alternative energy Monday night at a public hearing, approving the Small Wind Energy Facility Law after a lightly attended public comment session with no dissent. Town Board members with community input had been working on the ordinance since last October, finally hammering out the finished draft on June 8.

According to Councilman Aaron Flach, the impetus for the bill first came from numerous requests by different citizens to install wind turbines on their own property at prior planning board meetings. While the town had the capability to honor those requests at the time, the process required a special use permit which was complex and at times overwhelming.

Flach also noted that they wanted to create "a comprehensive standard" that was "streamlined, easy and simple" to use.

The law does not include anything about "wind farms," referring to turbine systems which act as a for-profit initiative, selling power to others. Only personal wind systems with generation ability up to 100 kilowatts of energy are included in the law. A moratorium was discussed by the Town Board for anything above that limit until further research is done on the... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

COXSACKIE - The Town of Coxsackie took steps to promote alternative energy Monday night at a public hearing, approving the Small Wind Energy Facility Law after a lightly attended public comment session with no dissent. Town Board members with community input had been working on the ordinance since last October, finally hammering out the finished draft on June 8.

According to Councilman Aaron Flach, the impetus for the bill first came from numerous requests by different citizens to install wind turbines on their own property at prior planning board meetings. While the town had the capability to honor those requests at the time, the process required a special use permit which was complex and at times overwhelming.

Flach also noted that they wanted to create "a comprehensive standard" that was "streamlined, easy and simple" to use.

The law does not include anything about "wind farms," referring to turbine systems which act as a for-profit initiative, selling power to others. Only personal wind systems with generation ability up to 100 kilowatts of energy are included in the law. A moratorium was discussed by the Town Board for anything above that limit until further research is done on the topic how to proceed.

Town Supervisor Alex Betke noted that local farmers had been particularly interested in the wind turbines, and the town was attempting to make it more viable for all of those interested.

A $150 fee for the building permit will be required for each turbine, however federal and state incentives from the USDA and NYSERDA are expected to fray the hefty costs of installation.

Keith Abrams, a specialist in installing wind turbines from the alternative energy company Green In Greene, noted that turbines don't have to be the giant, intimidating structures that can be seen from miles away. There was a wide range of models available, himself having a "50-foot high turbine ... with six-foot long blades" that was efficient for their needs. That said, he made sure to mention that every job he does is different and that they work with the customer to determine which particular setup will give them the energy they need in line with their wants.

Abrams stated that the interest in this area is not merely supportive by words, but also in jobs, keeping him more than busy dealing with demand.

For those who may be apprehensive about turbines near them, the law also requires a written acceptance from neighbors within 500 feet, and the turbine height may not exceed 120 feet.


Source: http://www.thedailymail.net...

JUN 30 2009
https://www.windaction.org/posts/20909-officials-streamline-wind-turbine-policy-demand-for-privately-owned-towers-prompted-law
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