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Not in tourism's back yard, says P.E.I. group of wind power

P.E.I. must care for the North Shore's famous views when expanding wind power generation, says the Dune Shores Tourism Association. The Island often uses views of the area east and west of Cavendish to sell the Island to tourists. But the province wants to triple its wind power generation, and a group has come forward to build in the area.

P.E.I. must care for the North Shore's famous views when expanding wind power generation, says the Dune Shores Tourism Association.

The Island often uses views of the area east and west of Cavendish to sell the Island to tourists. But the province wants to triple its wind power generation, and a group has come forward to build in the area.

Dune Shores Tourism Association president Matthew Jelley told CBC News on Tuesday the province needs to be careful about where it allows wind turbines to go.

"For most visitors it's the primary reason, is viewscapes," said Jelley.

"I would be very hesitant to put a large number of industrial-scale turbines along the central north shore region. It is the most famous viewscape of the province - postcard image of Prince Edward Island."

Dairy farmer Wayne Cousins is one of the people who wants to put up between 33 and 66 wind turbines on the North Shore. Cousins isn't exactly sure where it would erect the turbines, except to say the best wind comes off the water at Cape Tryon and then heads inland toward Long River.

He knows not everyone is thrilled with the idea.

"These wind turbines aren't going to be all in a... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

P.E.I. must care for the North Shore's famous views when expanding wind power generation, says the Dune Shores Tourism Association.

The Island often uses views of the area east and west of Cavendish to sell the Island to tourists. But the province wants to triple its wind power generation, and a group has come forward to build in the area.

Dune Shores Tourism Association president Matthew Jelley told CBC News on Tuesday the province needs to be careful about where it allows wind turbines to go.

"For most visitors it's the primary reason, is viewscapes," said Jelley.

"I would be very hesitant to put a large number of industrial-scale turbines along the central north shore region. It is the most famous viewscape of the province - postcard image of Prince Edward Island."

Dairy farmer Wayne Cousins is one of the people who wants to put up between 33 and 66 wind turbines on the North Shore. Cousins isn't exactly sure where it would erect the turbines, except to say the best wind comes off the water at Cape Tryon and then heads inland toward Long River.

He knows not everyone is thrilled with the idea.

"These wind turbines aren't going to be all in a cluster, 20 or 30 within a ten-acre space. They've got to be spaced out," said Cousins, before adding his own opinion of North Shore views and development.

"I don't think the wind turbines even come close to spoiling the view as much as these subdivisions. That's my own personal thought behind it, but I guess everybody has their own opinion."

Cousins said if the project moves ahead the public will get a chance to voice any concerns about the impact of turbines on the landscape.

Province taking its time

Cousins has been complaining that the province is taking too long in issuing its call for proposals for wind power.

The province first said it was interested in developing more wind power in October, then put a hold on the idea due to economic conditions in December. That hold is still in effect, but Cousins said his group is ready to go now.

Premier Robert Ghiz said it's unfortunate some people are getting impatient with the province's wind plan. Ghiz said government will take its time to do what is in the best interest of Islanders.

"You always have businesspeople who say things are moving too slowly. That's their decision. They can go somewhere else if they want," he said.

"We've got lots of people that are interested. People are going to complain about it, I suggest they go look at Nova Scotia, New Brunswick. They can go do it there because we've got lots of people interested here."

Ghiz said if at the end of the day if the business community doesn't want to do it, government will build it.


Source: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/pr...

JUN 24 2009
https://www.windaction.org/posts/20787-not-in-tourism-s-back-yard-says-p-e-i-group-of-wind-power
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