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Trouble at the mills

Plans for one of Britain's biggest on-shore wind turbines at the Dewlay factory near Garstang have hit a hitch. The Kirkland-based cheese firm hopes to start work on the 127 metres high turbine later this year and have it operational by Spring 2010.

Plans for one of Britain's biggest on-shore wind turbines at the Dewlay factory near Garstang have hit a hitch.

The Kirkland-based cheese firm hopes to start work on the 127 metres high turbine later this year and have it operational by Spring 2010.

But Dewlay and its backers, Wind Direct of Lancaster, which obtained planning permission after a recent appeal - now say they are unhappy with one of the detailed conditions which limits noise levels emanating from the towering structure - and want it changing.

If Wyre Council, which originally rejected the Dewlay tower plan, also rejects the amended noise level condition Wind Direct will appeal again - which could delay their timetable.

Wind Direct's development manager Nicola Mortimer said: "We believe that this condition is simply a typographical error, but wish to go through the correct procedures in having it amended.

"The important point is that predicted noise from the Dewlay wind turbine is below recommended levels."

She confirmed Dewlay and Wind Direct would appeal if Wyre turned down their plea to change the condition, and was confident they would win any appeal.

She said: "It is highly likely any appeal would be... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

Plans for one of Britain's biggest on-shore wind turbines at the Dewlay factory near Garstang have hit a hitch.

The Kirkland-based cheese firm hopes to start work on the 127 metres high turbine later this year and have it operational by Spring 2010.

But Dewlay and its backers, Wind Direct of Lancaster, which obtained planning permission after a recent appeal - now say they are unhappy with one of the detailed conditions which limits noise levels emanating from the towering structure - and want it changing.

If Wyre Council, which originally rejected the Dewlay tower plan, also rejects the amended noise level condition Wind Direct will appeal again - which could delay their timetable.

Wind Direct's development manager Nicola Mortimer said: "We believe that this condition is simply a typographical error, but wish to go through the correct procedures in having it amended.

"The important point is that predicted noise from the Dewlay wind turbine is below recommended levels."

She confirmed Dewlay and Wind Direct would appeal if Wyre turned down their plea to change the condition, and was confident they would win any appeal.

She said: "It is highly likely any appeal would be successful as this is a technical matter and not a point of subjectivity."

Wyre Council will make its decision on the requested condition change on July 1.
Kirkland Parish Council,.which covers the Churchtown area, was due to decide its response to the requested condition change last night.

And while a spanner has been thrown into Dewlay's already approved plans, opponents of the proposed wind farm scheme at Eagland Hill, are gearing up their fight to persuade Wyre planners to reject that project.

Cornish company Cornwall Light and Power want to site two 125 metre high turbines near the hamlet - but a local action group has circulated hundreds of glossy leaflets around greater Garstang and parts of Over Wyre urging residents to oppose the scheme at Orchard End.

Eagland Hill Action Group spokeswoman Julie Higham said developers were able to make huge profits from wind farms which were not the eco-friendly option commonly assumed.

She said: "It is not the only way to improve our carbon foot print. The driving force is money, not climate change."

"Once an area is 'spoiled' it is much easier to impose more turbines!"

She added little consideration had been given to the possible generation and health consequences of low frequency ground-borne vibrations and from 'shadow flicker' from the turbines' blades.

"This rural area depends mainly on agriculture and tourism as its key employment and revenue by its very title it is supported by people seeking solitude and an unspoilt rural landscape where agriculture tourism and equestrianism go hand in hand.
Cornwall Light and Power says its turbines would not damage the area's ecology or its pink-footed geese population as opponents have claimed.

A company spokesman said: "We are confident that these plans represent one of the best prospects for clean, renewable energy in Wyre."

A Wyre Council spokeswoman said no date had been fixed for its planning committee's debate on the Eagland Hill application. Any residents wishing to comment should send their views to the council as soon as possible.

Pilling Parish Council, which covers Eagland Hill, will meet tonight to discuss its response to the Orchard End turbines application. Several members of the public and the Eagland Hill Action Group are expected to attend the meeting at 7pm at the Pilling Memorial Hall.

The government has a target for another six more large-scale solo tower turbines in the North West by 2010.

There are already several turbines in the region, including in Morecambe Bay and at Caton Moor, near Lancaster.

Lancaster University has recently applied to construct two 125-metre turbines close to its campus near Galgate.


Source: http://www.garstangcourier....

JUN 10 2009
https://www.windaction.org/posts/20592-trouble-at-the-mills
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