Article

Wind farm plan 'no threat' to historic village

A campaign to stop a huge wind farm being built near Abbots Bromley has been dealt a blow after heritage experts claimed it did not pose a risk. Council-hired consultants - in their first appraisal for 12 years - have ignored fears that plans to put up eight 115 metre-high turbines in Bagots Park could ruin the village's conservation area. Instead, they say the damage caused to historic buildings by juggernauts rumbling down the high street is a more pressing concern.

A campaignto stop a huge wind farm being built near Abbots Bromley has been dealt a blow after heritage experts claimed it did not pose a risk.
Council-hired consultants - in their first appraisal for 12 years - have ignored fears that plans to put up eight 115 metre-high turbines in Bagots Park could ruin the village's conservation area.

Instead, they say the damage caused to historic buildings by juggernauts rumbling down the high street is a more pressing concern.

The report by Birmingham-based Tuffin Ferraby Taylor agreed that the wind farm would be visible from households on the upper north side of the village.

However, the study came to the conclusion: "It would seem unlikely to pose any major threat to the setting of the conservation area."

The verdict has been met with bewilderment by the protesters.

Mark Newstead, who formed the Abbots Bromley and Marchington Woodlands Wind Farm Action Group in 2000, said: "This is an historic village in a rural area and these turbines would be completely out of proportion with the surrounding countryside.

"It is not only the community of Abbots Bromley that will be affected by the wind farm,... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

A campaign to stop a huge wind farm being built near Abbots Bromley has been dealt a blow after heritage experts claimed it did not pose a risk.
Council-hired consultants - in their first appraisal for 12 years - have ignored fears that plans to put up eight 115 metre-high turbines in Bagots Park could ruin the village's conservation area.

Instead, they say the damage caused to historic buildings by juggernauts rumbling down the high street is a more pressing concern.

The report by Birmingham-based Tuffin Ferraby Taylor agreed that the wind farm would be visible from households on the upper north side of the village.

However, the study came to the conclusion: "It would seem unlikely to pose any major threat to the setting of the conservation area."

The verdict has been met with bewilderment by the protesters.

Mark Newstead, who formed the Abbots Bromley and Marchington Woodlands Wind Farm Action Group in 2000, said: "This is an historic village in a rural area and these turbines would be completely out of proportion with the surrounding countryside.

"It is not only the community of Abbots Bromley that will be affected by the wind farm, it will be hugely intrusive to anyone living near it.

"How a report by so-called experts can ignore that I don't know.
"Wind farms are more about making money then creating energy.

"In 20 years, they will serve no purpose - but that doesn't stop them destroying the area in the meantime."

But while the wind farm protesters have suffered a setback, the appraisal has boosted a campaign calling for the removal of "unsympathetic" street lights in the heart of the village.

The report reads: "The tall light columns bisect the space around Market Square and Butter Cross, destroying its character."

It is the second time conservation experts have criticised the lights, which were installed by Staffordshire County Council in August.

Inspectors from English Heritage joined local MP Michael Fabricant in the fight to have them taken down last October.

While the report highlights the damaging affect of these types of "creeping changes", it says it is the commuter-led demands on the village that poses the greatest threat.

The report reads: "An affect of heavy traffic flow is the impact on sensitive building fabric caused by vibration from the close proximity of large moving vehicles which is known to have detrimental results."

But the consultants stop short of recommending additional traffic calming measures.

Conservation areas are described as having "special architectural or historic interest, the character and appearance of which it is desirable to preserve or enhance".

Abbots Bromley is one of 25 sites in the borough to be designated by Staffordshire County Council.

A 27-day consultation has already started.


Source: http://www.thisislichfield....

JAN 17 2009
https://www.windaction.org/posts/18647-wind-farm-plan-no-threat-to-historic-village
back to top