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Wind power: Hunters have reason to be concerned

[H]unters may lose if wind developers have their way in Allegany and Garrett counties. In exchange for a few thousand dollars, the wind company can pre-empt landowners' rights to: allow hunting on their property, plant trees, extract sand and gravel, develop mineral rights, build additional outbuildings, etc. These landowner contracts subordinate the landowners' rights in favor of the wind developers. Leases, typically lasting a generation, prevent a landowner from complaining or taking action against the wind company because of noise, flicker, visual, vibrations, electric and radio frequency disturbances, and other side effects caused by the operation of the project. Hunters could lose their access even if the landowner is amenable to hunting.

It is that time of year again when sportsmen head to their favorite hunting areas to enjoy autumn days afield. However, hunters may lose if wind developers have their way in Allegany and Garrett counties.

In exchange for a few thousand dollars, the wind company can pre-empt landowners' rights to: allow hunting on their property, plant trees, extract sand and gravel, develop mineral rights, build additional outbuildings, etc. These landowner contracts subordinate the landowners' rights in favor of the wind developers.

Leases, typically lasting a generation, prevent a landowner from complaining or taking action against the wind company because of noise, flicker, visual, vibrations, electric and radio frequency disturbances, and other side effects caused by the operation of the project. Hunters could lose their access even if the landowner is amenable to hunting.

Would wind developers allow hunters to fire their rifles in the vicinity of wind turbines? The answer may not be positive. Furthermore, the noise of the turbine - "swoosh-boom-swoosh-boom" - may be enough to deter some hunters who depend on hearing the approach of deer or other game. How effective would spring gobbler season be if the... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

It is that time of year again when sportsmen head to their favorite hunting areas to enjoy autumn days afield. However, hunters may lose if wind developers have their way in Allegany and Garrett counties.

In exchange for a few thousand dollars, the wind company can pre-empt landowners' rights to: allow hunting on their property, plant trees, extract sand and gravel, develop mineral rights, build additional outbuildings, etc. These landowner contracts subordinate the landowners' rights in favor of the wind developers.

Leases, typically lasting a generation, prevent a landowner from complaining or taking action against the wind company because of noise, flicker, visual, vibrations, electric and radio frequency disturbances, and other side effects caused by the operation of the project. Hunters could lose their access even if the landowner is amenable to hunting.

Would wind developers allow hunters to fire their rifles in the vicinity of wind turbines? The answer may not be positive. Furthermore, the noise of the turbine - "swoosh-boom-swoosh-boom" - may be enough to deter some hunters who depend on hearing the approach of deer or other game. How effective would spring gobbler season be if the sounds of the caller were overwhelmed by the sounds of the turbines? Would turkeys and other wildlife dependent on hearing for communication even remain near such generating equipment if they could not hear each other?

There is also the possibility that some wildlife may just have an aversion to the immense tubular towers and rotating blades and associated habitat fragmentation and clearing.

The quietude of the hunt would also be destroyed by the noise of rotating turbine blades. Furthermore, strobe effects of the sun behind turbine blades may make it difficult to see forest game, particularly squirrels in a nearby oak tree.

In Texas, the concern has been that the income from wind plants may provide more incentives to landowners than the dollars earned from hunting leases. Hunters are beginning to lose their leases.

Hunters have reason to be concerned about further loss of wildlife habitat and places to hunt if industrial wind plants are built on western Maryland ridges.


Source: http://www.therepublicannew...

SEP 25 2008
https://www.windaction.org/posts/17252-wind-power-hunters-have-reason-to-be-concerned
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