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Wind energy bad choice for Monroe County

In my opinion as a realtor and architect, the true asset in Monroe County is to develop a recreational industry. With its location close to Madison, Milwaukee, Chicago, Wisconsin Dells, and the Mississippi River, and with the beautiful bluffs, ridges, and picturesque valleys inhabited by Amish settlements, this area has the potential to attract weekend tourists and vacationers, bringing business and employment to thousands of county residents and enterprises. This potential will be lost by the construction of wind turbines, which will pollute the landscape with towers and power lines.

I write this letter in hopes that you and your readers will be able to help me understand a mysterious development unfolding in Monroe County. This development may change this county forever.

Probably in a negative way.

I am a new comer to this community. I came to the United States in 1978 from Denmark, a graduate architect from Copenhagen University and entrepreneur with two U.S. patents. After many years of managing my own construction business, I am presently working in Chicago as a realtor in commercial and residential real estate. In the spring of this year I purchased 200 acres of beautiful land in the Town of Ridgeville, Monroe County, planing to semi retire in an Amish built cabin.

And then the mystery of Monroe County started to unfold.

Shortly after the closing I was contacted by Bill Blackmore, a representative of a Chicago company, INVENERGY, LLC. He introduced me to INVENERGY’s plan of building a number of wind turbine towers in the Town of Ridgeville, which will produce electricity. He offered me a contract with his company in exchange for $4,000.00 per tower built on my property.

This sounded great. Money for nothing. I will be a wind farmer cashing in on wind energy.... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  
I write this letter in hopes that you and your readers will be able to help me understand a mysterious development unfolding in Monroe County. This development may change this county forever.
    
Probably in a negative way.

I am a new comer to this community. I came to the United States in 1978 from Denmark, a graduate architect from Copenhagen University and entrepreneur with two U.S. patents. After many years of managing my own construction business, I am presently working in Chicago as a realtor in commercial and residential real estate. In the spring of this year I purchased 200 acres of beautiful land in the Town of Ridgeville, Monroe County, planing to semi retire in an Amish built cabin.

And then the mystery of Monroe County started to unfold.

Shortly after the closing I was contacted by Bill Blackmore, a representative of a Chicago company, INVENERGY, LLC. He introduced me to INVENERGY’s plan of building a number of wind turbine towers in the Town of Ridgeville, which will produce electricity. He offered me a contract with his company in exchange for $4,000.00 per tower built on my property.

This sounded great. Money for nothing. I will be a wind farmer cashing in on wind energy.

Coming from Denmark, which is the leading country in wind generated energy, and the manufacturer of wind turbines to be erected by INVENERGY, LLC. I was a very familiar with the concept.

I got so excited I decided to erect a medium size wind turbine on my property right away to generate electricity for my own use. Since I was going to pay for this turbine with my own money, I started watching for the wind before spending over $40,000 on this purchase.

After several months of observation, during spring, summer and fall, I realized that the winds on the ridge are marginal. In my experience in Denmark, these marginal winds were not sufficient to justify a multi-million dollar investment here on the ridge top ...

I started investigating the wind towers concept itself. By visiting the Web site of the Danish manufacture of wind turbines VESTA, I learned that after 30 years of experience they recognize the following fact:
The bigger the tower the better the efficiency.

The best and most economic development of wind generating facility is off shore behind the line of horizon. First of all, this will eliminate land ownership problems. Secondly, the transportation of these gigantic structures can be done inexpensively by ship. This will also eliminate destruction of the landscape by the towers. Wind conditions are always better off shore. Locating power lines would not be a problem and the biggest consumers of electricity like cities and industries are located by the shoreline.

From a conversation with my friend in Denmark, I learned that Danish milk farmers observed a significant reduction in milk production in cows raised in the vicinity of wind towers due to noise and low frequency vibrations. Also, the location of wind towers in the vicinity of airports will cause communication interference between airport and approaching aircraft. If the wind turbines interfere with communication, that will be only known after erection and operation of the turbine. In such a case the turbine tower has to be dismantled right away at the developer’s expense.

I gathered this information, and as of December 2005, I still have not seen any significant wind activity on the ridge. The developers erected a wind-monitoring tower on the ridge. With two airports, one at Fort McCoy and one in Tomah, much better weather records can be obtained from the Federal Aviation Authority, going back at least 50 years including wind maps for that same period. According to Wind & Sun Ltd., a Wisconsin based renewable energy company since 1981, in the winter we have four times more wind than during the rest of the year. According to their Wind Turbine Output study, the best utilization of wind turbine capacity is around 20% to 25% during the winter months. The average annual utilization is well below 10% -- probably not enough for a turbine’s own operation (turbines need initial electric energy to began to operate).

In my opinion as a realtor and architect, the true asset in Monroe County is to develop a recreational industry. With its location close to Madison, Milwaukee, Chicago, Wisconsin Dells, and the Mississippi River, and with the beautiful bluffs, ridges, and picturesque valleys inhabited by Amish settlements, this area has the potential to attract weekend tourists and vacationers, bringing business and employment to thousands of county residents and enterprises. This potential will be lost by the construction of wind turbines, which will pollute the landscape with towers and power lines.

After this preliminary observation I believe this is the worst location for a wind energy generating facility. Two of the obvious reasons: marginal winds and proximity to two airports.

Currently, the county has been preparing a new ordinance to regulate the development of a commercial wind farm. Now the county needs to consult with an independent person or entity with experience in this type of development to evaluate the ordinance and conduct a study on the environmental impact of such a huge development.

To solve this mystery I am trying to find answers to these questions:
1. Who is the developer?
2. How are they going to power the turbines with marginal wind conditions on the ridge?
3. Will the county request the developer to pay for an independent consulting service by local, established company with trustworthy business record?
4. Is the developer aware of potential problems with area airports?
5. Are the residents of Monroe County aware of the impact this will have on their future and land values?
6. Is the developer really interested in building wind turbines or does he need only the contracts with farmers for public stock speculative purposes?

I will greatly appreciate some help from you or your readers,

Ryszard Borys is a resident of Franklin Park, Ill. who owns property in the town of Ridgeville.

Source: http://www.tomahjournal.com...

JAN 16 2006
https://www.windaction.org/posts/1010-wind-energy-bad-choice-for-monroe-county
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