Articles filed under Erosion

The eco-conscious pay to ease guilt

SAN FRANCISCO - Jill Cody used to feel guilty whenever she drove her car or flew on an airplane. She worried about pumping heat-trapping carbon dioxide into the atmosphere and contributing to global warming. But the San Jose professor found a way to ease her conscience. She paid a San Francisco company called TerraPass to offset emissions from her car and air travel by investing in wind power and reducing farm pollution.
10 Dec 2006

Woodford wind farm in jeopardy; Some townships fear too much road damage

A multi-million dollar wind farm development in rural Woodford County is in jeopardy, the county’s administrator said Friday. “We’re as close as we have been to this thing not happening,” Administrator Gregory Jackson said of the proposed 79-turbine, $260 million facility northeast of Benson. If it is completed, it could be the largest economic development ever for Woodford County. The County Board will vote Oct. 17 whether to issue a special use permit allowing the company to build. Greene, Panola and Clayton township government bodies, with their attorney, Sheryl Kuzma, are negotiating a road agreement with the wind farm’s developer, Navitas Energy of Minneapolis, Minn. The townships say a road agreement is needed because the company will be hauling large truck loads of turbine components on rural roads.
7 Oct 2006

Wind Power: Fans opposition with neighbors in state

In many ways, the atmosphere is like a gold rush. With the backing of an enthusiastic Rendell administration, wind-energy companies have quietly but aggressively been negotiating leases for land on mountaintops, especially in Bedford and Somerset counties. Several developers hope to build hundreds, if not thousands, of windmills on the ridge lines of west-central Pennsylvania. Typical wind turbines stand nearly 375 feet tall -- about 70 feet taller than the Statue of Liberty -- and can be seen from 15 to 20 miles away. Some people question whether development of wind energy on this scale is appropriate for Pennsylvania, even though wind often is touted as a renewable, nonpolluting way to generate electricity. Longtime residents of Somerset County, where the building is more advanced, say the construction and operation of turbines have damaged the environment. They say the development offers little in return from jobs or taxes. "It's not quite what they tell you in the brochure," Todd Hutzell of Rockwood said.
1 Oct 2006

Turitea wind farm threat to city

A wind farm in the Turitea Reserve could ruin the city water supply. Erosion could be a problem that would be difficult to overcome, a Massey University geography professor says. The $1 million a year the Palmerston North City Council is hoping to get for its wind farm might not be enough to pay for the damage it does, John Flenley says. The problem is the removal of vegetation – native bush or scrub, whatever – to install the turbines themselves, as well as the road construction needed to the site. And it could take 100 years for all that vegetation to grow back.
22 Sep 2006

http://www.windaction.org/posts?p=9&topic=Erosion&type=Article
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