Library filed under Offshore Wind

Lack of sound science in assessing wind farm impacts on seabirds

Lack_of_sound_science_in_assessing_wf_impacts_seabirds-jpe12731_thumb This paper argues that the methods and data used when estimating effects of offshore wind turbines on seabird population rates and the potential impacts on seabird populations are grossly inadequate. As a result,  Environmental Impact Assessments cannot solely be relied on to report risks. The conclusions cited in the paper are provided below. The full paper can be accessed by clicking the links on this page. 
16 Sep 2016

The nation’s first offshore wind farm is ready to go, despite critics’ blowback

Mary Jane Balser, who owns Block Island Grocery, typically the island’s biggest electricity consumer, is even more blunt. For years she tried to win grants to connect the island to the mainland electricity grid in an effort to escape the unreliability of diesel generators. “Financially,” she said this month, the wind farm “just makes no sense.”  Rhode Islanders will pay more for power to subsidize a project benefiting Deepwater’s private investors, Balser said. “It’s not benefiting Block Island. It’s not benefiting Rhode Island. The notoriety of being the first in the nation? Can I take that home and eat it?”
29 Aug 2016

Study: Wind Power fiercer than expected

The paper's main finding is that atmospheric conditions around Cape Wind are predominantly turbulent, or unstable ...between 40 and 80 percent of the time. ...When the atmosphere is unstable, it is similar to turbulence experienced by airline passengers during a flight — the wind is choppy and causes high winds from above and slow winds from below to crash into each other and mix together, causing a bumpy and unpredictable ride for the air current.
12 Aug 2016
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