Library filed under Offshore Wind

R.I. squid fishermen fear wind power

Rhode Island fishermen say a patch of the Atlantic Ocean south of Martha’s Vineyard is among the best places around to catch squid. They are also the same waters in which a developer selected by Massachusetts plans to install up to 100 giant wind turbines that would supply clean, renewable energy to the state.
2 Jul 2018

Recreational anglers have stake in offshore wind power

Given that everyone from Republican Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker to Democratic Rhode Island Governor Gina Raimondo to Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke have all been vocal in their support for offshore wind power, the question is not if more wind farms will be built, it is if they will be built in a way that works for fishermen — commercial and recreational alike.
30 Jun 2018

Amendment urges more wind farm oversight

These wind turbines, standing at 643 feet with red lights atop each tower in the latest proposal would be visible from the beaches of Ocean City and Assateague Island National Seashore,” he said. “The wind turbines, as currently proposed, will reduce property values, jeopardize the safety of maritime travel and pose a threat to Ocean City’s commercial fishing and tourism industries.”
16 Jun 2018

Fishing impact study sought on offshore wind farm

Because of the relative unknowns, U.S. Congressman Andy Harris (R-1-Md.), who represents Ocean City and the Eastern Shore, has successfully attached an amendment to the federal fiscal year 2019 Commerce, Justice and Science Appropriations bill, which would order the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to study the effects of offshore wind projects on marine mammals and fish as well as the need for any mitigation measures. The amendment was authored by Harris and was passed by the committee.
25 May 2018

R.I. selects Deepwater Wind to build 400-megawatt offshore wind farm

That Block Island price, which started at 24.4 cents per kilowatt hour and is escalating at 3.5 percent a year, is significantly higher than the price National Grid pays for power from fossil fuel-burning generators and other conventional sources. It is, however, competitive with other renewable energy projects that have been developed in Rhode Island. It is unclear whether Vineyard Wind’s price is lower than the price from the Deepwater project.
23 May 2018

http://www.windaction.org/posts?p=3&topic=Offshore+Wind
back to top